Lexington in 1775 Unit Description 
The eight lessons in this unit introduce 3

rd

 graders to Lexington’s role in launching the American Revo-

lution. On the fateful day of April 19, 1775, armed English colonists living in Lexington faced the Eng-
lish soldiers because they wanted to protect the munitions stored in Concord as well as their freedom to 
own land and govern themselves. 
 
To understand how Lexington residents reached this moment, students need to learn about daily colo-
nial life in a farming community. They need to understand: 

1. That many families had lived in Lexington for generations, and England seemed very far away.  
2. That although England seemed far away, Massachusetts colonists (and Lexington residents) de-

fined themselves as English. 

3. That when a family owned its own farm land it could support itself (and sell excess food and 

other products) and not be dependent upon anyone. This was a freedom not easily obtainable in 
England. 

4. That residents were used to governing themselves through church, town, and colony structures. 
5. That residents resented the way that England was trying to control them through taxes and mili-

tary force. 

6. That residents expected a military showdown, and were involved in stockpiling supplies that 

they wanted to protect from the British soldiers. 

 
Lesson 19a: Settling Lexington

 

 

By hearing the story of first settler, William Munroe, thinking about the work of clearing land,  and 
comparing 17

th

 and 18

th

 century houses, students will: 

1. Learn that Lexington was settled by Cambridge farmers seeking pasture for grazing cattle in the 

mid 1600s. 

2. Understand that

 

by the mid 1770s, Lexington was an established community, with deep roots in 

the land and families that had been here for three or four generations. 

 
Lesson 19b: Lexington in 1775: Who Am I ? Family Life  
In this lesson, students take on the role of a young person who actually lived in Lexington in 1775 and 
will learn about this person’s family and place in the household structure. Students will: 

1. “Meet” a young person living in Lexington in 1775. 
2. Explore this individual’s place in the household structure. 

 
Lesson 19c: Lexington in 1775: Where Do I Live? House and Community 
Here students learn what colonial houses looked like, how they were furnished, and how families met 
daily needs such as heat and light. They look at maps of Lexington and consider how roads and house 
placement affected the community. They also learn that everyone in Lexington farmed for a living. Stu-
dents will: 

1. Identify the characteristics of their 1775 character’s house and farm. 
2. Compare their own homes to those of their 1775 character’s. 
3. Discover where their character lived in 1775. 

 
Lesson 19d: Lexington 1775: Where Do I Live? Farms and Farming  
In this lesson students learn about colonial farming. They create their own family farms using tem-
plates. Students will: 

1. Identify the characteristics of a successful Lexington farm in 1775. 
2. Identify what a family needed to produce to support itself.