Lesson 19a: Settling Lexington  

 
Materials and Resources 

• Study print: Newly Cleared Fields  
• Handout: English Wigwam 
• Handout: Georgian Style House 
• Handout: Similarities and Differences in Houses 

 
Instructional Objectives 
Students will 

1. Learn that Lexington (as a town) was settled by Cambridge residents seeking wood, hay and 

pasture for grazing cattle in the mid 1600s.  

2. Understand that

 

by the mid 1770s, Lexington was an established community, with deep 

roots in the land and families that had been here for three generations. 

 
Background for the Teacher 
The daily lives of Lexington residents, and the landscape itself, changed enormously between the 
mid 1600s, when the first English settlers established residence here, and 1775. Lexington’s first 
name was Cambridge Farms; we don’t know what the Indians called it. Cambridge residents came 
here to cut wood for fuel and housing, and to obtain hay for their cattle.  
 
William Munroe, great-great grandfather of Levi Harrington (who was 12 in 1775), and great 
grandfather of William Munroe (who ran the tavern that bears his name and fought in the American 
Revolution), was one of the first Lexington residents. He was born in Scotland, captured by the 
English during the English Civil War at the Battle of Worcester, and shipped with more than 400 
other Scottish war prisoners to New England in 1652. Here the Scotsmen were sold to English colo-
nists and required to work without pay for 5 to 8 years (similar to indentured servants, who sold 
their labor to pay for transportation to the colonies, except that William Munroe and the other Scots 
had no choice about coming to America). 
 
William Munroe was purchased by a miller named John Adams from the Menotomy section of 
Cambridge (today’s Arlington), and William later worked for another Cambridge man, Joseph 
Cooke. Historians believe that William came to Lexington to cut hay or to care for the Adams or 
Cooke cattle in the mid 1650s. 
 
Young William, who was about 17 years old in 1652, may have walked with the cattle from Cam-
bridge to Lexington in the spring. He probably built himself a shelter to live in during the summer, 
staying near the cattle to guard them from wild animals. He would have grazed the cattle on natu-
rally-occurring grass lands that the Indians had kept cleared of underbrush. Part of William’s job 
may have been cutting grass for hay, and cutting down trees to clear more land for fields and mead-
ows. 
 
William Munroe settled permanently in Lexington, first renting, then later buying his own land. He 
built a house, married, and raised a large family. He and his family created a farm out of forest and 
swamp and stony ground. They cleared land by cutting down trees, burning stumps, and heaving 
stones out of fields. They plowed the land and planted crops, gardens, and fruit trees. They also 
probably dug ditches to drain wetlands (Lexington had lots of swamps). They would have turned 
the logs from the trees they felled into lumber for their house and barn. Luckily another early Lex-