ington resident, Englishman Edward Winship, had built a saw mill for this purpose. William, 
his family, and his neighbors put a tremendous amount of physical labor into transforming the 
wild woods, meadows, and swamps into orderly and productive farms. 
 
One hundred and twenty-five years later—in the 1770s—Lexington was a completely different 
place. It was no longer a frontier town. Some families had lived in Lexington for three genera-
tions. Fields had been cleared of trees and fenced, and apple orchards planted. About 800 peo-
ple lived in about 120 farming households. Everyone who lived in Lexington farmed, but the 
town also had wheelwrights, blacksmiths, coopers, tanners, housebuilders, tavern keepers, 
clockmakers, teachers, shoemakers and tailors. When the British soldiers marched through town 
on April 19, 1775, they encountered a well-established community where residents had deep 
roots. 
 
About the Materials and Resources 

• Image, Newly Cleared Fields 

Although this image shows a Canadian scene in 1791, the fields with tree stumps show 
what much of New England looked like as land was cleared and fenced. This is how 
Lexington might have looked in the mid 1600s. 

• English Wigwam worksheet 

There is no evidence that early Lexington settlers ever lived in wigwam-like houses. 
More likely, only settlers near the coast borrowed house styles from Native Americans. 
By the time Lexington was settled, people probably built European-style cabins as their 
first homes. The wigwam shown here was made by bending saplings into an arch, then 
covering them with pieces of bark. The chimney is European. Indians did not build 
chimneys. Instead, they  cut holes in the roof to let the smoke out. This is a house that 
one or two people could build by themselves, using resources that they found around 
them. 

• Georgian-Style House worksheet 

In 1775, this house style was stylish. Only people with land and money could build a 
nice house like this. It was made by first building a post-and beam structure, and then 
covering it by nailing on overlapping wooden clapboards. Windows were glass, the 
chimney was brick, and the roof was probably wooden shingles. A house like this re-
quired people with specialized woodworking and bricklaying skills. 

 
Vocabulary 

• Wigwam – a Native American dwelling covered by bark or mats. The word wigwam 

comes from the Algonkian word root, “wik,” which means “to dwell.” 

• Georgian-style house – in New England, Georgian was an architectural style popular in 

the 1700s. It was named after the four English kings named George in the 18

th

 century. 

Georgian houses are rectangular, with a front door in the middle of one of the long sides 
of the house, and the same number of windows on either side of the door. The decora-
tions around windows and doors are classical (Greek and Roman) in style, with pillars, 
arches, and pediments (which are triangles above doors or windows). 

 
Activities and Teaching Sequence 

1. Tell William Munroe’s story. Have students illustrate it or brainstorm what William