Lesson 19b: Lexington in 1775: Who Am I? Family Life 

 
Materials and Resources 

• Handout: 30 Lexington children role cards (15 boys and 15 girls between the ages of 5 and 15), 

side 1 (fold and laminate for extended use) 

• Handout: Who Am I in 1775? 
• Handout: Families in 1775 and Today 
• Large pieces of paper for family portraits 
• Pencils, crayons or markers 

 
Instructional Objectives 
Students will 

1. “Meet” a young person living in Lexington in 1775. Each student will continue to explore the 

life of this young person for several lessons. 

2. Explore this individual’s place in the household structure. 

 
Background for the Teacher 
In 1775, about 800 people in about 120 households lived in Lexington. A household might include par-
ents, children, grandparents, hired help (such as farm workers and servants), slaves, and sometimes 
other relatives, such as aunts and cousins. In New England, families were the basic social and eco-
nomic unit. This was different than in the southern colonies, where the majority of people—slaves—
were not able to live in family groups, or in the middle colonies, where both slavery and indenture 
made family life more rare. Anyone living in the New England household—even if not a blood rela-
tive—was considered the responsibility of the household head, and therefore part of the “family.” 
 
In the 1770s, the average age for marrying was 26 for men and women. Women typically gave birth 
every two years, producing many children. Large families were normal, and since every household 
member was expected to work to contribute to the family’s survival, many children meant lots of help-
ful hands.  
 
Many Lexington families were related to each other. As long as enough land was available for farming, 
parents tried to settle their children nearby. Over generations, people married neighbors and neighbors 
became kin. Families like the Munroes, Harringtons, and Parkers, who had lived in Lexington for many 
generations, must have felt a deep sense of belonging, continuity, and permanence.  
 
Unlike today, when our society has more old people than young people, Lexington in 1775 was full of 
young people.