Activities and Teaching Sequence 

1. Discuss lesson 19a’s homework assignment of finding current usage of the names Es-

tabrook, Clarke, Fiske, Harrington, Loring, Mulliken, Parker. Explain that these were 
the name of families who lived in Lexington in 1775, and the class will be learning more 
about them. 

2. Distribute the first page of one role card to each student. Show them how to fold it in 

half (or do this before hand and laminate it so that you have a permanent classroom set). 

3. Ask the students to read only side 1 of the role card: the side that lists family members 

and describes the family. 

4. Have each student fill out the worksheet, “Who Am I in 1775?”  
5. Ask students to compare their families in 1775 to their families today. What is the same, 

what is different? (For instance, ask, are you the same age as your character? Do you 
both have an older sister? Does your grandmother live with you? Do you have 6 
younger siblings?) Use the handout, Families in 1775 and Today, if you wish. In your 
subsequent discussion, make sure your students see that families in 1775 tended to be 
larger, with more children (later they will see that children were an important work force 
on the farm). The comparison between your students’ real families and their 1775 fami-
lies should help them identify with their counterparts from long ago, and make them cu-
rious about why things were different. 

6. Group students by 1775 family (there are nine different families represented in these 

role cards). Ask each group to imagine what the members of their family looked like, 
telling them that we don’t know what any of these people looked like in 1775. Then 
have each group of students create a group portrait of their 1775 family.  

7. As homework, ask students to write a paragraph-long biography of their 1775 charac-

ters, following the instructions on the bottom of the “Who Am I?” worksheet.