Lesson 19c: Lexington in 1775: Where Do I Live? House and 

Community 

 
Materials and Resources 

• Handout: 30 Lexington children role cards, side 2 
• Handout: My House in 1775 
• Handout: 1775 Floorplans and Facades  
• Handout: Lexington Map 
• Handout: Lexington Street Map 

 
Instructional Objectives 
Students will 

1. Identify the characteristics of their 1775 character’s house and farm. 
2. Compare their own homes to those of their 1775 character’s. 
3. Discover where their character lived in 1775. 

 
Background for the Teacher 
Some of the nine Lexington families featured in this unit lived in old houses. Massachusetts Bay colo-
nial houses built before 1750 were usually variations on one of two basic plans. The simplest were one-
room houses with a fireplace along an outside wall and either a ladder to a garret or a stairway to a sec-
ond-floor chamber. None of the nine families had a house this small. The more common colonial house 
type, however, was the two-room “hall and parlor” house. Two-room houses had a center chimney that 
provided fireplaces to the parlor, or best room, and to the hall, which we would call the kitchen, where 
most household production took places. Both of these rooms were multipurpose rooms: the parlor often 
held the parents’ bed (the “best bed”) and sometimes a second bed, trundle bed or a cradle, along with 
table and chairs for entertaining visitors. This was the more public of the two rooms. The kitchen was 
the place of food preparation and general processing of raw materials into home goods; food, textiles, 
candles, soap, etc. A more substantial hall-and-parlor house might have a staircase to a second floor 
with chambers over the hall and the parlor. These rooms were also multipurpose, usually used for 
sleeping, textile production, and storage of grains and supplies. 
 
By 1700, many rural folk were expanding their hall-and-parlor homes by the addition of a first floor 
lean-to. This created an additional room along the back of the house, and additional garret space above. 
This popular addition soon became integral to the hall-and-parlor house plan, so that “saltbox” houses 
were built with the lean-to addition and the larger kitchen fireplace included in the center chimney 
stack to serve the long back lean-to room. The lean-to area was frequently separated into three rooms: a 
small bedroom at one end, the large kitchen area in the middle, and a dairy or pantry area at the other 
end. The garret area of the lean-to might also have a small area walled-off as an upper sleeping section. 
 
After 1750, prosperous families sometimes chose a new “Georgian” style home. Georgian style homes 
had two chimneys serving four downstairs rooms, a front and back room on each side of a center hall-
way with a center staircase. Each of these downstairs rooms was matched by a second floor sleeping 
room above. Other prosperous homeowners remodeled their hall and parlor homes into eight room 
(four up, four down) square-ish homes, frequently with hip roofs ( a roof that slopes down to all four 
sides of the house) such as the Munroe Tavern boasts today. 
 
Best china and silver were usually kept not in the kitchen but in the parlor, where it could be on display