for company. If the house had luxury items such as clocks, pictures, books, or silver, these were 
also kept in the parlor. 
 
Textiles were often the most valuable possessions of a family. Most households had bed sheets, 
pillowcases, and a blanket for each bed. Some had a coverlid or quilt and bolsters as well. A 
few had bed curtains. Window curtains were a luxury item. Most households also had some 
number of tablecloths and napkins, and usually some quantity of woolen or linen cloth or skeins 
of yarn. The value of these linens usually exceeded the value of all other household furniture. 
 
Houses were heated by burning wood in the fireplaces. Procuring firewood was an arduous task 
(starting with cutting down a tree, then trimming its branches, transporting it out of the woods, 
sawing it into fireplace-sized lengths, splitting those into chunks, aging it—for green wood does 
not burn well—before the final step of carrying it into the house to be burned), so most people 
were careful about how much firewood they used. Fires were only lit in rooms that were in use 
for a period of time, so in the winter, the only warm room in the house might be the kitchen. 
People were used to living in cold houses and sleeping in cold bedrooms. In this period, fire-
places did not have dampers, so lots of heat was lost up the chimney. 
 
Most colonial families depended on sunlight for the main source of light. Candles were precious 
because they took a lot of effort and resources to make (candles were made from rendered and 
strained beef fat, called tallow), and most families used them sparingly. This meant that family 
members tended to go to bed when it got dark and to get up when the sun came up. If they 
stayed up past sundown, they used light from the fireplace to see. If they lit a candle, everyone 
would crowd around to use its light. 
 
Eight of the nine families featured in this unit lived along the main road to Cambridge, which 
today we call Massachusetts Avenue. This through road was very important to the town and its 
inhabitants. It allowed residents to travel to Cambridge and Boston to sell what they had made 
or produced on their farms, and to buy what they did not have. It brought travelers through 
town, and the several taverns attest to the need to provide food and overnight accommodations 
to those who were passing through. And of course, it was the presence of this road,  and the fact 
that Concord lay further along it to the west, that brought the Redcoats to Lexington on the fate-
ful day of April 19, 1775. 
 
Vocabulary 

• House façade – the outside front of a house 
• Parlor – the best room. Today we would call it the living room. Parlors often served 

double-duty as a bedroom for parents, grandparents, or guests. 

• Chamber – an upstairs room. A chamber was often referred to by the room directly be-

low it, such as parlor chamber, referring to the room above the parlor. Chambers often 
served as bedrooms. Bedroom was not a word that people used.  

 
Activities and Teaching Sequence 
Part One: House 

1. Ask the students to read side 2 of the first role card about the character’s house and farm 

in 1775.