2. Have each student fill out the worksheet, My House in 1775. 
3. Give each student a copy of the 1775 Floorplan and Façade worksheet. Explain that a 

floorplan is a map of the house and that the blackened areas show the position of the 
chimneys. Help them see where the fireplaces are (the angled cut sides). Have them lo-
cate the front door and the hall. Point out that these floorplans do not show doorways in 
between rooms (other than the front door). Have them return to their worksheets to add 
more information or to correct mistakes. 

4. Organize students into family groups (you should have nine families: Brown, Clarke, 

Estabrook, Fiske, D. Harrington, J. Harrington, Loring, Mulliken, Parker). Ask students 
to pick the one that best matches the description of their 1775 house. Answers: 1 – Mul-
liken and Clarke (but bigger) 2 – Loring, Estabrook, perhaps Harrington, Fiske, and 
Brown, 3 –Jonathan Harrington, and 4 – Parker.) Have them redraw their floorplan to 
better fit their description, if necessary. Have them decide which room was which in the 
downstairs. If you have time, have students redraw and color their houses’ facades. 
(Note: many country houses in this time period were not painted or stained, and would 
be the color of wood. Fancier houses might be painted white, red, gray, or brown. Doors 
might be dark brown, red, green, or blue.) 

5. Discuss what it was like to live in these houses. How did people heat their houses in the 

winter? What did they use for light? How did they cook their food? Did the house feel 
crowded? How much privacy would a person have? 

6. Ask each student to write a letter from his/her 1775 character’s point of view describing 

the house. 

 
Part Two: Community 

1. Hand out the Lexington Map. What can they tell about Lexington from it? (Not much—

just what towns bounded Lexington, and that a road ran through it). Focus on the road. 
It still exists today as Massachusetts Avenue. Back then it was a dirt road. Ask whether 
this was the only road in town (no, there were lots of smaller farm lanes connecting 
farms to the main road). Why is this road marked and not others? (Because this was a 
through road, in one direction leading to the market towns of Cambridge and Boston, 
and in the other to Concord). 

2. Hand out the Lexington Street Map. Have each student find his or her own house (and in 

some cases, shops) and circle it. The houses are identified by the head of household’s 
name, so make sure that the students find the right one (there are several Harringtons 
and Browns, for instance). The only house not represented on this map is John Parker’s, 
for he lived two miles from the common in the south east part of Lexington. Have the 
Parker family students draw in the Parker house on the other map. 

3. Discuss: Why did so many families live along the main road? Did they know their 

neighbors?