Lesson 19d: Lexington in 1775: Where Do I Live?  

Farms and Farming 

 
Materials and Resources 

• Handout: Colonial Farms in Lexington 
• Handout: Colonial Farming Vocabulary  
• Study print: Wheelock Farm. This image is available on the Internet. Type “Francis Alexander 

Ralph Wheelock's Farm” on a search engine like Google. One of the best sites (because the im-
age is large) is www.skidmore.edu/~tkuroda/hi323/Farm1822byFrancisAlexanderNatlGArt.jpg 

• Handouts: 9 farm land allocation cards (Laminate them for extended use over the next several 

lessons) 

• Handout: Acre template  
• Handout: Colonial farm animals and symbols 
• Handout: 7 Sheep vs. 1 cow math problem 
• Large sheets of blank paper 
• Scissors 
• Glue sticks 
• Colored markers 

 
Instructional Objectives 
Students will 

1. Identify the characteristics of a successful Lexington farm in 1775. 
2. Identify what a colonial family needed to produce to support itself. 
3. Understand that owning land meant freedom and independence for Lexington residents. 

 
Background for the Teacher 
In 1775, all Lexington residents lived on farms. Even the minister and the tavern keeper farmed. An 
average Lexington farm was about 65 acres. In order to support the household, and ideally to produce 
enough extra to sell, each farm family tried to acquire or create a variety of land types on their farm. 
The ideal farm had: 

• Tillage to grow grain for people and animals (corn, wheat, oats, barley, rye).  
• Pasture for grazing cows, horses, oxen, sheep, and goats. 
• Fresh meadow where farmers mowed naturally-occurring grasses that grew along river banks 

and in some lowland marshy areas. Lexington was blessed with a good quantity of fresh 
meadow, which was considered very valuable. Not only did it not have to be cleared or planted, 
but it was renewed in nutrients annually by flooding cycles. 

• Orchard for growing apples. Apples could be stored through the winter. They were also dried, 

made into applesauce, and pressed for cider. Apples provided farmers with a cash crop. 

• Woodlot to harvest trees for fuel and building. 

Often farmers owned pieces of land all over town (and sometimes in other towns) in order to get the 
types of land they needed.  
 
A farm typically included: 

• A house: for shelter, work, and entertaining. 
• A barn: for work, storage, and animals. 
• A paddock: a fenced area for animals next to the barn.