• A shop: many farm families had businesses, such as blacksmithing, clockmaking, or 

woodworking, that required a workspace separate from the house and barn. 

• Outbuildings: small buildings like sheds (for sheep), corncribs (for storing corn), out-

houses (bathrooms), and cider mills. 

• A garden near the house for growing vegetables and herbs. 

 
Most Lexington farmers had the following animals: 

• Cows: for milk (cheese and butter), hides, and meat. 
• Pigs: For meat and hides. 
• Chickens: for eggs and meat. Chickens were never counted in tax records so your stu-

dents will have to decide for themselves how many chickens were on each farm. 

 
Some Lexington farmers also owned: 

• Sheep or goats: for wool, hides, and meat. 
• Oxen: for pulling plows and carts. Oxen were neutered bulls (you might just call them 

cattle) trained to obey voice commands.  

• Horses: for transportation. 

Farmers had to build fences out of wood or stone to keep animals in or out of fields. 
 
Owning land was critically important to Massachusetts residents. It helped shape their sense of 
identity and independence. By the 1770s, a number of Lexington families lived on farms that 
their parents and grandparents had painstakingly cleared and improved. This knowledge gave 
Lexingtonians a connection to the past and helped them feel attached to a place. Farming gave 
families a way to support themselves; this gave them independence and made them free of slav-
ery or indenture. Only landowners could vote (and in most cases it was restricted to men, al-
though sometimes landowning widows could vote), and this too helped to define freedom and 
independence. 
 
About the Resources 

• Study print, Wheelock Farm: Although this landscape was painted in the early 19

th

 cen-

tury, it provides a pretty accurate picture of a well-off late 18

th

 century farm in 

Southbridge, Massachusetts. Men and boys are scything (cutting) hay, raking it into 
piles, and then loading the piles onto the wagon to bring up to the barn for storage. A 
pair of oxen are pulling the wagon. The hay will turn yellow when it dries. Note the 
buildings (house, barns outbuildings), stone walls, and trees (which could be an or-
chard). One man near the center of the painting seems to be carrying a jug and a basket. 
The jug might be filled with switchel, a drink made of water, sugar, molasses, vinegar 
and ginger. “Ralph Wheelock’s Farm” was painted by Francis Alexander in 1822. It be-
longs to the National Gallery of Art (1965.15.3). 

• The 9 farm land allocation cards contain information about the land and animals of the 

nine Lexington families featured in this unit. The information comes from the 1771 tax 
valuations. Periodically, the province required each town to prepare a list of all taxpay-
ers and taxable property lying within the town. About every seven years a detailed list 
was required, including a count of all acreage by improved usage (meadow, pasture, till-
age), and all livestock by type (oxen, cows, horses, sheep, swine). These valuations did