not include information about land that was not taxed, which included house lots, or-
chards, woodlots, fields lying fallow, and unimproved land. Note that although the cards 
say “Goats and Sheep,” it is likely that Lexington farmers had sheep, not goats. “Cows” 
refers to cattle (both male and female). The one land allocation card that is different 
from the others is that of the Clarke farm. Because he was the town’s minister, Jonas 
Clarke’s farm was not taxed. Thus, we don’t know how much land he had for each type 
of farming activity. Students in the Clarke family group can make educated guesses 
based on Clarke’s faming activities, which he listed in a journal. 

 

Activities and Teaching Sequence 
Part One: Farming in 1775 

1. Explain that everyone was a farmer. The whole family (and often non-family members) 

worked to survive and make a living. Farmers tried to make extra to trade for things that 
they could not make. 

2. Brainstorm with class what is needed to survive (clothes, food, shelter, fuel). Help them 

imagine survival in the colonial period without electricity, central heat, or other modern 
conveniences. Ask them what they might expect to find on a colonial farm. 

3. Ask students to think about what kinds of land a farmer would need. For instance, can 

you let the cow graze in the garden? Can you plant crops in the apple orchard?  

4. Hand out Colonial Farms in Lexington for your students to read. Review vocabulary by 

handing out Colonial Farming Vocabulary list. 

5. Study the Wheelock Farm landscape image to help student picture an 18

th

 century farm. 

Ask students what they see, what is missing (and where might it be)? Ask them to imag-
ine stepping into the picture. What do they smell? What do they hear? 

6. Discuss the size of an average farm in Lexington in the 1770s (65 acres). Help students 

visualize an acre (about three-quarters of a football field). 

 
Part Two: Make Your Own Farm 

7. Have students design their own 18

th

 century farms: 

• Divide students into family groups. Distribute the appropriate land allocation card to 

each group. Review the different types of land (tillage, orchard, pasture, upland 
meadow, woodlot). Students will be creating a map of the farm described on their land 
allocation card with the acre templates provided. 

• Provide each group with large sheet of paper to serve as the base of their farm. 
• Assign tillage and orchard to one student in each group, pasture to another, 

meadow and woodlot to a third. 

• Hand out an acre template sheet to each student. Students can either cut each 

acre square apart, or they can work in bigger increments (4 acre chunks, etc.). 
Encourage students to do as little cutting as possible, and instead to use their 
math skills to group the acre squares into the sizes they need or the different land 
types. 

• Have students decide where they want to put each land type. Remind them that 

they don’t have to put the same land types in one place. For instance, a farmer 
might have 6 meadows totaling 29 acres scattered around his farm. Glue every-
thing down. 

• Have students label or color code each land type.