8. Solve the Seven Sheep versus One Cow math problems, and use it to discuss how many 

animals each farm’s pasture might support. 

• As an extension activity, distribute the Colonial Farm Map Animals and Sym-

bols sheet to each student. Using the information provided on their land alloca-
tion cards, have them cut out the proper number of animals and arrange them on 
their farm maps. Encourage students to include houses, barns, and outbuildings 
on their map. Have them draw in streams and ponds and hills.  

9. Compare maps. Does each group have the same total number of acres, or the same land 

allocations? Who might grow more apples? Why is one person able to own more sheep 
or cows? Help students understand that farmers were trying to produce more than their 
family could use, so that a farmer with 9 cows might be making cheese to sell at market, 
and a farmer with 6 oxen might rent them to neighbors who didn’t have any. 

10. For homework, ask students to write and illustrate a letter to a far away relative describ-

ing their farm. Letters should include descriptions of the different types of land, the ani-
mals and what they do or what they are used for, and the buildings on the farm.