Lesson 19e: Lexington in 1775: What Are My Jobs? 

 
Materials and Resources 

• Handout: 30 Lexington children role cards, side 3  
• Handout: What are My Jobs in 1775? 
• Handouts: Farm Work (men) and Farm Work (women) 
• Handouts: Farm Work Descriptions (men and women) 
• Handout: Reverend Clarke’s Farm Year 
• For the teacher: Teacher’s annotated version of Reverend Clarke’s Farm Year 

 
Instructional Objectives  
Students will 

• Identify what kinds of work children did on farms in 1775. 
• Learn that each family member contributed to the family’s survival. 
• Understand how many aspects of farm work were linked to seasons. 

 
Background for the Teacher 
18

th

 century farm children were a crucial labor force. They were expected to contribute to their fami-

lies’ survival by working. Historian Jack Larkin writes, “In the countryside, farm and family were in-
tertwined, almost indistinguishable. The work of the farm encompassed a complete spectrum of neces-
sary tasks, for small and unskilled hands as well as for older and more knowledgeable members of the 
farm labor force. Each member of the family was an interlocking member of a productive unit directed 
by the head of the household. Beginning…with shelling corn or weeding the garden, children took on 
increasingly difficult tasks as they grew up. Girls worked with their mothers in learning crucially im-
portant sewing, cooking and dairying skills; boys labored with their fathers in barn, fields, and shop.” 
 
Farm work was seasonal in nature. Men and boys felt this more than women and girls. Spring was for 
plowing and planting, summer for haying, fall for harvesting and making cider, winter for butchering 
animals, cutting trees, and hauling them out of the woods. Men and boys spent much of their time out-
side, in the barn, or in the shop. In comparison, women’s and girls’ work, like cleaning, cooking, and 
sewing, washing, and mending clothes, was much less dependent on the time of year. Certain tasks 
though, did depend on the season. Women were usually responsible for planting the kitchen garden of 
vegetables and herbs in the spring. They churned butter from the cows that had recently calved. In the 
summer they weeded the garden and, once the weather was too warm to make butter, made cheese. Fall 
was the time for putting up food from the harvest for the long winter. In winter, women and girls 
helped to preserve by smoking or salting the newly butchered meat.  
 
Jonas Clarke was Lexington’s minister, a position he had held since 1755. In 1773, his household con-
sisted of himself, his wife, nine children (three more would later bring the total of living children to 
12), and hired men and women who lived together on a farm with a house, barn, outbuildings, and 50 
acres of surrounding farmland. The land had been farmed for over 70 years and was fully “improved;” 
pastures cleared and fenced, an established orchard, hayfields, and garden. Unlike some farmers in 
Lexington, Clarke did not have to spend time on the backbreaking work of clearing land. Reverend 
Clarke kept a journal in which he recorded some of his farming activities. The Lexington Historical 
Society owns the journal. 
 
About the Resources