• Farm Work (men) – The activities pictured are: 

1 – Chopping wood. Splitting wood was a never-ending chore, for cooking fires re-
quired fuel all year round. A man is carrying a load of wood, probably into the house. 
An axe is propped on a log, and a neatly stacked pike of short logs is ready to be split.  
2 – Setting fences. Fences kept animals penned in and out of fields. Men often prepared 
new fence posts in winter, and then used them to replace rotted pieces in the spring. 
Farmers checked their fences regularly, for a break could mean disaster if animals got 
into a field and ate or trampled on a crop. 
3 – Butchering a hog. Late fall or winter, when it was cold, was the time to kill a pig. 
The cold weather helped keep the meat from spoiling before it could be salted or 
smoked. The picture shows a steaming kettle of water. The hog, gutted but otherwise 
whole, will be hoisted and dunked into the kettle. The boiling water will soften the skin 
and make it easier for the farmers to scrape the hair off. 
4 – Sowing seed. In the spring, farmers carried precious seeds in a sack to their fields, 
and sprinkled them evenly on the ground by hand. 
5 – Threshing grain. After it was cut, brought into the barn, and dried, farmers beat grain 
with long sticks to separate the seeds from the stalks.  
6 – Cutting grain – Farmers are using sharp, curved knifes called sickles to cut grain 
down. The farmer on the left is binding a bunch of grain stalks into a sheaf to make it 
easy to carry back to the barn. 

• Farm Work (women) – The activities pictured are: 

1 – Caring for children. The baby pictured is in an early version of a baby walker, which 
provided support for the child and kept it out of trouble. Since married women generally 
bore babies every two years, babies were a constant fixture in a household.  
2 – Baking bread. Women cooked all meals over an open fire in the kitchen, and baked 
bread by heating up a brick oven set into the fireplace. 
3 – Churning butter. After milking the cow, women let the milk sit in wide, shallow 
milking pans until the cream rose to the top. They would skim off the cream and then 
beat it in the butter churn until it turned into butter. This could only be done in cool 
weather. In hot weather, milk was made into cheese instead. 
4 – Doing the laundry. Dirty clothes were washed by hand. The water had to be carried 
from the well or spring, heated over the fire, and poured into a clean tub. After adding 
soap, women would soak, pound and rub the clothes to clean them. More water was 
needed for rinsing. They hung clothes outside in good weather, and all around the house 
in bad weather, to dry. 
5 – Spinning wool. Even though woven cloth was available in stores, country women 
sometimes spun their own wool, which they would knit into mittens, scarves, and hats, 
or have a weaver weave into cloth (not many women knew how to weave or owned 
looms). 
6 – Making candles. Women made candles by rendering, or melting, cow fat, and the 
pouring it into molds. It was cold weather work, after a cow had been slaughtered. 

 
Teaching Activities and Sequence  

1. Help students imagine 18

th

 century farm work by studying the Farm Work images. You 

can cut them apart and distribute them as individual cards or keep them together as 
sheets. Cut apart and distribute the Farm Work Descriptions. Ask students to match the