Lesson 19f: Lexington in 1775: What Can I Buy?   

 
 
Materials and Resources 

• Handout: 30 Lexington children role cards, sides 3 and 4 
• Handout: What is it? Where would you get it? Images (3 pages) 
• Handout: What is it? Where would you get it? Descriptions (3 pages) (cut these apart into 12 

separate cards before you teach.) 

• Handout: What Can I Buy? 

 
Instructional Objectives 
Students will 

1. Describe ways that residents specialized or produced excess to enable them to buy what they 

could not make. 

2. Identify items that Lexington residents needed but could not produce themselves. 
3. List the types of items the Lexington residents bought from England. 

 
Background for the Teacher 
Like people today, Lexington families wanted to get ahead to improve their lives for themselves and 
their children. They tried to produce more farm goods than they could consume so that they could sell 
extra items like butter, cheese, eggs, hay, grain, meat, and hides. Many families developed sideline 
businesses in addition to farming. Benjamin Brown had more oxen and cows than most people, so he 
was probably selling meat and hides, and trading the labor of his oxen (for plowing fields) to his 
neighbors in exchange for services or goods that he needed. Benjamin Estabrook had a grist mill on his 
property, and probably ground grain for neighbors. Joseph Fiske was a doctor as well as a farmer. Jo-
seph Loring was a tailor, and his daughters taught school. Daniel Harrington was a blacksmith. Jona-
than Harrington was first a trader—taking farm products to the city to sell, and bringing home city 
items to sell and charging a fee for both—and then a money lender who charged interest. Nathaniel, 
John and Samuel Mulliken were clockmakers. John Parker was a wheelwright.  
 
But not everything could be produced on the farm. People bought furniture, carpets, plates, kitchen 
utensils, farm tools, textiles, books, foods, and beverages made in other places. They bought them in 
nearby stores (Lexington did not have a store, but Concord did), or by going to Cambridge or Boston, 
or by placing an order with someone like Jonathan Harrington, who would find what they needed on 
his trading expeditions. 
 
One of the reasons why people reacted so strongly to the taxes imposed by Parliament was that the 
items that they needed to buy were suddenly more expensive. Everyone bought tea shipped from Eng-
land. Most people’s fabric for clothes came from England. Important ingredients, like sugar, cinnamon, 
and nutmeg, were shipped from England.