Activities and Teaching Sequence 

1. Begin by asking students to review what Lexington families produce on their farms and 

in their work shops. The handout: 30 Lexington children role cards, sides 3 and 4, will 
help students provide this information. You may want to create a list on the blackboard.  

2. Ask students if the list they created includes EVERYTHING that a family would need. 

The answer should be “no,” there are many things that a farm family could not produce 
themselves. Ask students to brainstorm a second list of what they might need that they 
couldn’t make.  

3. Distribute the handout: What is it? Where would you get it? Images (3 pages). Explain 

that these 12 images depict items that were commonly found in a household. (Instead of 
giving every student one set of three pages, you might want to divide the class into small 
groups, and group work with one set or one page). 

4. Distribute a set of the cut apart handout: What is it? Where would you get it? Descrip-

tions (3 pages) to each student or each group of students. Ask them to match the descrip-
tion to the appropriate image. (One student can read aloud the description while the oth-
ers look for the matching image). When they have are satisfied that they have found the 
correct matches, have them glue or staple the description to the back of the correct im-
age. 

5.  Ask students to answer the two questions on the back of each card. (What is it? Was it 

made by someone in your family, by a skilled neighbor, or would you buy it from a 
store?). Discuss their answers. Not everyone may agree. 

6. Distribute the handout: What Can I Buy? After deciphering it with the students, ask 

them again, what kinds of things would “your” Lexington 1775 family buy in a store? 
Why couldn’t these items be produced on a farm in Massachusetts? Where did the items 
in these stores come from? 

7. Conclude the lesson by telling the students that many of the items in the store were 

taxed by Parliament to make money to help pay for the debt incurred by the French and 
Indian War. In the next lesson they will investigate Lexington residents’ reaction to the 
tea tax. 

8. Extension activity: Students can do independent research projects on the items discussed 

in these lessons. Where were they made? Who made them? What were they made out of 
and how were the made? Who used them?