Lesson 19g: Lexington’s Tea Party 

 
Materials and Resources 

• Handout: Lexington Town Meeting, 1773 
• Handout: Name Cards, 1773 (make two copies and cut out one set to pass out to students before 

the mock town meeting, keep one set for yourself) 

• Handout: Lexington’s Tea Bonfire, 1773 
• Gavel or some form of wooden stick to use to knock on the “podium” when asking for town 

meeting to begin and end, or to keep the meeting on task. 

• Sign (or write on blackboard): How shall Lexington respond to the Tea Act? 
• The Boston Tea Party, by Steven Kroll  
• The Boston Tea Party: Angry Colonists Dump British Tea, by Allison Stark Draper 
• Boston Tea Party, by Pamela Duncan Edwards 
• “Glossary of Town Officers…” from Old Sturbridge Village website. Go to 

www.osv.org

 and 

find their online lesson plan on town meetings. 

• Additional resource: To learn how Lexington’s town meeting operates today, visit the Town of 

Lexington’s web site: http://ci.lexington.ma.us/townmeeting/understandtownmeet.htm 

 
Instructional Objectives 
Students will  

1. Learn how Lexington residents governed themselves through town meeting. 
2. Learn how colonists in Boston and Lexington revolted against the Tea Act. 

 
Background for the Teacher 
In 1773, Lexington citizens considered themselves British, with all the rights of British citizens. They 
strongly believed in John Locke’s theory of social contract, that governments are formed by the people, 
and should be responsive to its citizens. Massachusetts had already been subject to the Stamp Act and 
the Townshend Acts in the 1760’s and reacted by boycotting the taxed goods including tea. Britain fi-
nally rescinded those laws. But Britain kept 3,000 soldiers in Boston to “keep the peace,” and contin-
ued to try to impose its will on its faraway American colony which didn’t take kindly to the directives.  
 
In the 1770s, Parliament imposed a small tax on tea, called the Tea Act, which would have the effect of 
helping the East India Company retain its monopoly on the tea trade. The colonies were wary of any 
taxation originating in England rather than in the colonies themselves. Many towns and villages de-
cided to once more boycott tea. Boston’s reaction to the tax led to the famous “Tea Party” in which 
some colonists, dressed up as Indians, boarded a ship carrying tea and threw the tea into the harbor. 
Lexington held a town meeting in 1773 to consider what response to make. 
 
Lexington residents knew that they were governed by the King of England, and by the Crown ap-
pointed governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Thomas Hutchinson. But they deeply valued their 
ability to govern their own local affairs, which they did through elected positions and through town 
meeting, a form of local government still used in Lexington today. During the Colonial era, each per-
son who owned land in the town could vote at town meeting. Few women owned land, and so few 
women were allowed to vote.  
 
Today Lexington has a “representative” town meeting where delegates are elected from each of nine 
precincts to represent citizens. Citizens of the town also elect a council of five Selectmen, who serve