for three years, and who make decisions about whom to hire for Town Manager. The Town 
Manager then selects the Police Chief, Fire Chief, tax collector and other civil servants the town 
needs to function.  

 

 
Town meeting is presided over by an elected Moderator . The Moderator “recognizes” speakers 
at town meeting who may not speak unless given permission. When someone wishes to speak, 
they must stand quietly and wait for the Moderator to recognize them. Each speaker must stand 
while addressing the assembly. Each speaker may speak only twice on the same issue without 
asking permission from the rest of the meeting. The Moderator is addressed as “Mr. Moderator” 
or “Madam Moderator” and is invoked before any participant gives their opinion or even asks a 
question. 
 
In 1773, Lexington voters took their rights seriously and voted with their hearts, minds and feet, 
even defying the government of the day. Lexington’s town meeting of December 13, 1773, 
voted to support a strongly worded resolution which was sent to the Committee of Correspon-
dence in Boston to be circulated throughout Massachusetts and the other colonies. Here is the 
last set of resolves from that letter: 
 

“That we will not be concerned with, directly or indirectly, in landing, receiving, buying 

or selling or even using any of the Teas sent out by the East India Company or that shall be Im-
ported Subject to a Duty.... 
 

That all such persons as shall, directly or indirectly...shall be deemed and treated by Us 

as Enemies of their Country.--- 
 

That the Conduct of Richar[d] Clark and Son, the Govenours [sic] two sons, Thomas 

and Elijah Hutchinson, and the other consignees in refusing to resign their appointment...as re-
peatedly requested by the town of Boston has justly rendered them Obnoxious to their fellow 
citizens....We cannot but consider them as objects of our Just Resentment Indignation and Con-
tempt.” 
 

....We trust in GOD that should the state of our afairs [sic] require it, we shall be ready 

to Sacrifice our Estate, and everything dear in life, yea and Life itself, in Support of the com-
mon cause. 
 

“The above resolve being passed a Motion was made that to them another should be 

added” 
 

“That if any Head of a family in this Town or any Person shall from this time forward 

until the Duty be taken off purchase any Tea or use or Consume any Tea in their Families such 
person shall be looked upon as an Enemy to this Town and to this Country and shall be treated 
with neglect and Contempt.” 
 
These Resolves were approved on December 13, 1773 and sent to Boston the next day. That 
very night Lexington residents “brought together every ounce” from their homes “and commit-
ted it to one common bonfire.” This was Lexington’s own “Tea Party.” The “Boston Tea Party” 
occurred three days later on the evening of December 16.  
 
Teaching Activities and Sequence 

1. Read aloud Drapers’s and Edward’s books about the Boston Tea Party to give students 

background. You may want to stop reading after you finish reading about the events on 
December 13, so that you don’t give away what happened in Boston before your stu-