dents have a chance to learn what happened in Lexington. 

2. Create a timeline. You will find information in Steven Kroll’s book. 
3. Hand out Lexington’s Town Meeting, 1773. Discuss. 
4. Tell students that they will be asked to pretend they are Lexington citizens in the year 

1773. Pass out a name card to each student. Based on the information on the card and 
from what they know, what would their characters think about the tax? 

5. Tell students that they will go to a Lexington town meeting to decide what the town 

should do about the Tea Act. Remind students that only land owners could speak up or 
vote at town meeting so most of them would be men (except for a few widows), and that 
all of them would be farmers.  

6. Introduce the concept of town meeting. Explain that in Lexington today there is a Repre-

sentative town meeting where each of the nine precincts elect twenty-one representa-
tives (for a total of 189) to do their voting for them, but in colonial times, any land own-
ing citizen of Lexington could show up at the meeting and vote.  

7. Appoint yourself as the Meeting Moderator. The Moderator runs the meeting in a very 

formal manner. Whoever wants to speak stands up and waits for the Moderator to recog-
nize him or her. The Moderator would say, “The Chair recognizes Mr. Jones, not having 
previously spoken.” The speaker then addresses the Moderator to speak to the citizenry; 
“Madam Moderator, I believe we should....” Town meeting uses Robert’s Rules of Or-
der to keep the discussion moving but use your own discretion!  

8. Moderate a discussion responding to the question, “How shall Lexington respond to the 

Tea Act?” Remind students to answer as they think their character would. 

9. At the end of the discussion, “call the question” and have students vote on whether to 

vote. Then, if they are ready, have students vote on the options they have selected. An-
nounce the results and adjourn town meeting. 

10. Ask students to return to the 21st century and ask if anyone knows what really hap-

pened in 1773. Ask if they ever heard of the “Boston Tea Party.” Explain what hap-
pened in Boston as a reaction to the tea tax.  Explain that history books tend to be about 
heroes and not about ordinary people.  

11. Explain what Lexington residents did by reading or paraphrasing the resolves and by 

handing out or paraphrasing Lexington’s Tea Bonfire, 1773. The ordinary people of 
Lexington made a really important decision to defy British law because they thought the 
law was unfair. It has always been important in this country for citizens to take part in 
political decisions. In Lexington that still means government through town meeting, and 
it also means ordinary citizens going to vote in state and national elections to make their 
wishes known. Ask students if they know what happened after 1773. Remind them of 
Patriot’s Day which celebrates the Battle of Lexington and Concord which took place on 
April 19, 1775. Remind them that the people involved in that battle were the very same 
townspeople who had argued so strongly against the Tea Act two years earlier. 

12. As an assessment, ask students if they will be able to explain to someone else why the 

events of December, 1773 should be called Lexington’s “Tea Party.” Ask them to do it 
through a Quick Write where they write everything they can think of about the lesson in 
five minutes.  

13. As an optional extension/modification: Before this lesson, introduce the class to town 

meeting by having a practice town meeting where you argue something light and 
slightly silly to get students to participate fully. Ask students to debate whether or not