Reasons to Leave 

Supplement to Lesson 12: Reasons to Leave 

 
Supplement Activity Overview and Rationale: 
 
Using a map of British North America and the population growth statistics from 1660 – 1775, students 
will trace emigration from Europe and Africa to North America and the West Indies, and read and in-
terpret graphs of the changes in population over time. This supplement addresses the absence of infor-
mation in the existing lesson about the great numbers of African slaves coming to North America dur-
ing the period of early immigration to America.  
 
Supplement Instructional Objective 
 

1. Recognize that great numbers of African slaves came and settled America during the same pe-

riod as European immigrants. 

 
Materials 

 

Settling the New World video and worksheet (Schlessinger) 
Text: America Will Be 
Handout: Slavery’s True History 
Handout: Why They Left / Where They Went  
Packet: Chart the Differences  
 
Procedure 

 

1. Show the video, complete the note taking exercise, have students write a journal response, and 

create a class list of journal responses, as described in the existing lesson. 

 
2. NEW: Conduct a class discussion based on the journal responses as described in the existing 

lesson, but also ask students about groups who came to America who were not mentioned in the 
video. In particular, discuss the Africans who came to America involuntarily as included in the 
people who came and settled America. 

   

3. NEW: Provide students with the handout Why They Left / Where They Went. 

 

4. NEW: Divide students into five groups (English, French, Spanish, Dutch and Africans) and in-

struct each group to find reasons their group settled in the New World. The groups research-
ing Europeans can use America Will Be; the group researching Africans may use American 
Will Be
 for information about the southern colonies, and should see the attached resource 
“Slavery’s True History,” for information about the New England colonies. 

 

When finished, each group will present findings to the rest of the class, and all students can 
fill in anything they missed on their charts. 
 

5. Conduct a class discussion of the similarities and differences of each culture based on the infor-

mation gathered and recorded on the chart.