Slavery in New England 

Supplement to Lesson 17: The Beginning of Slavery in the Colonies 

 
Supplement Activity Overview and Rationale  
 
Using quotes, maps, and census data, students will explore slavery in New England and understand that 
slavery was legal and prevalent in Massachusetts in the years leading up to the Revolution. 
 
Instructional Objectives: 
Students will 

1. Examine evidence and reach conclusions on the role of slavery in New England. 

 
Materials 

 

Handout “Quotes About Slavery in New England” 
Table of Massachusetts census data 
Massachusetts county map 
1755 Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island population map 
 
Procedure: 

 

1. After studying the beginnings of African slavery and slave life in the colonies in Lesson 17: 

The Beginning of Slavery in the Colonies, assess students’ knowledge of slavery in New Eng-
land. Did it exist in Northern states like Massachusetts? How was it alike and different from 
Southern slavery? 

 

As a class, make a list of what students already know about slavery in New England. 
 

2. Tell students that they will examine evidence, including real Massachusetts laws, quotes from 

real people, maps, and population charts to see what they can learn about slavery in New Eng-
land. 
 

3. Teaching the quotes: 

a) 

Hand out the Quotes about Slavery in New England sheet and ask for four volunteers.  

b) 

The volunteers will each read one quote and where it came from outloud to the class.  

c) 

Conduct a class discussion on what these quotes teach us about slavery in New Eng-
land. For example, 

 

It started as early as 1642 

 

Some felt that slavery in Massachusetts was necessary in order for the colony 
to be successful 

 

Newspapers were used to advertise slave sales 

 

Laws were passed and enforced to limit and control slaves in New England. 

 Slaves could be violent. 

d) 

Consider adding what students say in this discussion to the list created in step #1. Or 
create a new list titled “What we’ve learned about slavery in New England.”