In Depth Background Resource for Teachers  

 
NOTE: A complete narrative of the events featured appears in Ray Raphael, The First Ameri-
can Revolution: Before Lexington and Concord
 (New Press, 2002). 
 

 
 
 

 
In fact, the American Revolution did not begin with “the shot heard round the world.” It started 
more than half-a-year earlier, when tens of thousands of angry patriot militiamen ganged up on 
a few unarmed officials and overthrew British authority throughout all of Massachusetts outside 
of Boston. This powerful revolutionary saga, which features Americans as Goliath instead of 
David, has been bypassed by the standard telling of history. By treating American patriots as 
innocent victims, we have suppressed their revolutionary might. Our nation came into being 
because people stood up for themselves and their own best interests. 
 
On December 16, 1773, patriots dressed as Indians dumped 742 chests of tea, worth £15,000, 
into the Boston Harbor. Although we take considerable pride in recounting the story today, in 
the years that followed Americans never celebrated the event, and they certainly didn’t call it a 
“tea party.”

i

 While some patriots rejoiced at the boldness of the affair, they could hardly capital-

ize on this act of vandalism in their propaganda. The East India Company could easily be per-
ceived as the victim, not the antagonist, and even many patriots thought the company should be 
recompensed for destroyed property.  
 
But when the King and Parliament retaliated for the destruction of tea with four extreme meas-
ures labeled “Coercive Acts,” the colonists did indeed become oppressed. They were handed a 
“victim” card, and they played it liberally. Renaming the measures the “Intolerable Acts,” radi-
cal patriots garnered much support for their cause.  
 
The story of the Coercive Acts and the response they triggered can be told two ways. According 
to the standard version, the first and most important of the measures was the Boston Port Bill, 
which prohibited all commerce to and from Boston. Parliament intended to isolate Boston and 
starve its rebellious residents into submission, but this plan backfired when other colonists 
sprang to the aid of their brothers and sisters. United behind the suffering Bostonians, other 
colonists heaped aid on their beleaguered friends and braced themselves for a Revolution. 
 
Today, this Americanized adaptation of the “Good Samaritan” is repeated again and again in 
accounts of the events leading up to the Revolutionary War. It feeds the notion of a perfect 
America: our nation was founded by the world’s nicest people, with neighbor aiding neighbor 
from the very start. But revolutions do not generally stem from acts of charity, and this one was 
no exception. Our nation came into being because people stood up for themselves and their own 
best interests.   
 
There is an alternate narrative, although it has rarely been told in the past hundred and fifty 
years. According to this version, it was not the Boston Port Bill but one of the other coercive 

The following is an excerpt from Ray Raphael, Romancing the Revolution: Stories that 
Hide our Patriotic Past
 (New Press, 2004).