As in Great Barrington, Springfield, and Worcester, patriots shut down the governmental appa-
ratus in Salem, Concord, Barnstable, Taunton, and Plymouth— in every county seat outside 
Boston. From the time the Massachusetts Government Act was supposed to take effect, no 
county courts, which also functioned as the administrative arm of county governments, were 
allowed to conduct any business under British authority. According to merchant John Andrews, 
rebels in Plymouth were so excited by their victory that they attempted to remove Plymouth 
Rock (the one on which their fore-fathers first landed, when they came to this country) which 
lay buried in a wharf five feet deep, up into the center of the town, near the court house. The 
way being up hill, they found it impracticable, as after they had dug it up, they found it to weigh 
ten tons at least. 
 
Meanwhile, all the Crown-appointed Counselors were told by their angry neighbors to resign. 
The few who refused were driven from their homes and forced to flee to Boston, where they 
sought protection from the British Army. 
 
In direct violation of the new law, the people continued with their town meetings. When Gover-
nor Gage arrested seven men in the capital of Salem for calling a town meeting, three thousand 
farmers immediately marched on the jail to set the prisoners free. Two companies of British sol-
diers retreated — and throughout Massachusetts meetings continued to convene. According to 
one account,  
 
“Notwithstanding all the parade the governor made at Salem on account of their meeting, they 
had another one directly under his nose at Danvers, and continued it two or three howers longer 
than was necessary, to see if he would interrupt ‘em. He was acquainted with it, but reply’d — 
“Damn ‘em! I won’t do any thing about it unless his Majesty sends me more troops.” 
 
By early October 1774, more than half a year before the “shot heard round the world” at Lex-
ington, Massachusetts patriots had seized all political and military authority outside of Boston.  
 
Throughout the preceding decade, patriots had written petitions, staged boycotts, and burnt effi-
gies — but this was something new. In the late summer and early fall of 1774, patriots did not 
simply protest government, they overthrew it. Then, after dismissing British authority, they as-
sumed political control through their town meetings, county conventions, and a Provincial Con-
gress.  
 
One disgruntled Tory from Southampton summed it all up in his diary: “Government has now 
devolved upon the people, and they seem to be for using it.”  
 
When the Boston Port Bill took effect, other colonists passed the hat for relief, held days of 
prayer and fasting, and called for conferences to talk things over.

iii

 These were common forms 

of political action in British North America. When the Massachusetts Government Act took ef-
fect, the people of Massachusetts shut down the government and prepared for war. This was the 
stuff of revolution. The people of Massachusetts forcibly overthrew the old regime and began to 
replace it with their own.

iv

 

 
The traditional telling, which states that the “American Revolution” started at Lexington, con-