ceals this momentous and historic transfer of political power. If the “shot heard round the 
world” was the beginning of the American Revolution, we have no way of accounting for the 
revolution that preceded it.  
 
The traditional story masks the people’s vibrant dedication to their own political survival. Many 
years later, Mellon Chamberlain asked Levi Preston, a veteran of the Battle of Concord, why he 
had become a revolutionary:  
 
“Were you not oppressed by the Stamp Act?” 
“I never saw one of those stamps, and always understood that Governor Bernard put them all in 
Castle William. I am certain I never paid a penny for one of them.”  
“Well, what then about the tea-tax?” 
“Tea-tax! I never drank a drop of the stuff; the boys threw it all overboard.” 
“Then I suppose you had been reading Harrington or Sidney and Locke about the eternal princi-
ples of liberty.” 
“Never heard of ‘em. We read only the Bible, The Catechism, Watts’ Psalms and Hymns, and 
the Almanack.” 
“Well, then, what was the matter? And what did you mean in going to the fight?” 
“Young man, what we meant in going for those Redcoats was this: we always had governed 
ourselves, and we always meant to. They didn’t mean we should.”

v