Notes and References 
 

Alfred F. Young, The Shoemaker and the Tea Party (Boston: Beacon Press, 1999), 108-133.  

ii 

The story of the 1774 overthrow of British authority throughout Massachusetts, outlined in the following para-

graphs, is told in Ray Raphael, The First American Revolution: Before Lexington and Concord (New York: New 
Press, 2002).  

iii 

Much is made in many narratives about the “Day of Prayer and Fasting” held in Virginia, the most populous 

colony, on June 1, 1774. Supposedly, this revealed how devoted the Virginians were to the people of Massachu-
setts, since it caused the British to disband the Virginia House of Burgesses. In fact, many Virginians were acting 
according to self-interest, not charity, when they decided on this course. The previous year, growers of tobacco 
(the basis of Virginia’s economy) had announced that by 1775 they would withhold their crops from the market. 
They hoped that British merchants would then buy tobacco at higher prices, anticipating the shortage to come. 
Since many tobacco planters were in debt, however, they feared that creditors would take them to court in retalia-
tion, and if their scheme failed, the courts could seize their property. 
 

Supporting Boston with a “Day of Prayer and Fasting” and a pledge to boycott British trade solved all 

their problems. Not only did these actions give their market manipulation a patriotic cover, but they also caused the 
British government to dissolve the Legislature, and since the Legislature had not yet authorized the court fees, that 
meant the courts would have to close as well. The planters’ plan worked like a charm: tobacco prices soared in 
anticipation of future shortages, while growers sold out their crops before nonexportation was scheduled to take 
effect. Meanwhile, no British merchants could take any Virginians to court for unpaid bills. 
 

Boston had asked other colonies to withdraw trade from both Britain and the West Indies. For the reasons 

above, Virginia planters were more than willing to comply with respect to Britain, but they refused to end their 
lucrative trade with the Indies. Similarly, South Carolina went along with much of the boycott, but they insisted on 
an exemption for rice, their main money-maker. These actions, traditionally touted as sympathetic gestures of sup-
port, had decidedly self-serving overtones. [Woody Holton, Forced Founders: Indians, Debtors, Slaves and the 
Making of the American Revolution in Virginia
 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1999), 115-129.] 

iv 

A “revolution,” according to the Random House Webster’s College Dictionary, is “a complete and forcible over-

throw and replacement of an established government or political system by the people governed.” By this defini-
tion, the people of Massachusetts staged a textbook example of a revolution. 

Quoted in Thomas A. Bailey and David M. Kennedy, eds., The American Spirit: United States History as Seen by 

Contemporaries (Lexington: D. C. Heath and Co., 1994), 1: 143.