Procedure: 
 

1. Introduce the topic and give the necessary background for understanding the Massachu-

setts Government Act. For example, 

 

Did you know that the Battle of Lexington was not really the beginning of the American Revolution? The 
first “revolution,” or overthrow of an existing government, happened the year before, when common 
farmers from throughout Massachusetts toppled all British authority.  
 
We don’t usually hear about this story because common people are not often taken seriously. They 
should be! We will take their actions seriously by placing ourselves in their places. How would you have 
responded if you were a farmer in Massachusetts who had just lost the power to vote?

 

 

2. Divide the class into three groups: Worcester, Plymouth and Springfield, Massachusetts. 

Each member of the group is given a card with an identity on it. All but one will be 
males since only widows who owned property could vote (but there were not very many 
of those). The participants will be mostly farmers, with a couple of merchants or crafts-
men. No more then two in each town can be wealthy. All will own at least a small 
amount of property. 

 
3. Hand out the situation worksheet. Read, review, and discuss as a class. Ask students to 

think about the situation from the point of view of their role. They may want to make a 
few notes for later. 

 

4. Have the groups separate and discuss the problem each in his or her character. The 

group may choose a moderator. The moderator must recognize any speaker. 

 

Alternatively, you may want to only have one group—that is, the whole class—represent 
one town. In this case, the teacher can act as the moderator. There will be only one speaker 
at a time. The speaker will stand up while addressing the meeting. No person can speak 
more than once on the same issue without asking permission from the rest of the meeting. 

 

5. What reaction will your town take? As a group, determine your town’s reaction to the 

Massachusetts Government Act. The people of the town meeting must think about how 
the British might respond, and how you might respond to their response. 

 

6. After the groups have come to a decision, have each group share the town’s course of 

action. Discuss what they think will be the response from the British. 

 
Individual assignments and assessments:  
 
Students can write up and defend their chosen courses of actions. Some writing might focus on 
the decision-making process, on either the individual or collective level.