Conclusion: 
 
It is important to emphasize that what the real people chose to do represented only possible re-
sponses, as opposed to guessing “right.” Students should discuss how and why they came to 
their decisions. Hopefully they weighed what they (that is, their characters) wanted against what 
they thought might be possible. This is key to political decision-making! 
 
Conclude by sharing what really happened after the Massachusetts Government Act was 
passed, and by repeating the basic message: everybody, not just the famous leaders, makes im-
portant political decisions that affect their own lives. That’s how our nation was founded! 
 
Additional activity 
 
Consider having students act out this scene between Levi Preston and a historian, many years 
after the War was over. 
 
Many years later, after the war was over and the United States had become a strong, independ-
ent nation, a historian named Mellon Chamberlain interviewed Levi Preston, a veteran of the 
Battle of Concord about his role in the Revolutionary War. By then Levi Preston was an old 
man. The text below is a record of their conversation. The language here is slightly updated. 
The original is in the in-depth background resource for teachers, in this lesson. 
 
INTERVIEWER: Why did you fight in the War? Were you oppressed by the Stamp Act?” 
 
LEVI PRESTON: No, I never saw one of those stamps, and always understood that Governor 
Bernard put them all in Castle William. I am certain I never paid a penny for one of them. 
 
INTERVIEWER Well, what about the tea-tax? 
 
LEVI PRESTON: Tea-tax! I never drank a drop of the stuff; the boys threw it all overboard. 
 
INTERVIEWER: Then I suppose you had been reading Harrington or Sidney and Locke (these 
are all philosophers
) about the eternal principles of liberty. 
 
LEVI PRESTON: Never heard of ‘em. We read only the Bible, The Catechism, Watts’ Psalms 
and Hymns, and the Almanack. 
 
INTERVIEWER: Well, then, what was the matter? What did you mean in going to fight? 
 

LEVI PRESTON: Young man, what we meant in going for those Redcoats was this: we always 

had governed ourselves, and we always meant to. They didn’t mean we should.