What Really Happened after the Massachusetts Government Act was Passed 

  
In all of Massachusetts outside of Boston, people decided to shut down the government.  
 
From mid-August through mid-September of 1774, tens of thousands of plain folk from rural 
Massachusetts, mostly farmers—participated in a spontaneous uprising. 
 
In Worcester, 4,622 militiamen from 37 surrounding communities lined both sides of Main 
Street on the day the court was supposed to meet, while the Crown-appointed officials walked 
the street, hats in hand, reciting their resignations thirty times each so all could hear. At that 
time, Worcester only had 300 citizens. 
 
In Springfield, Plymouth, and all the county seats, the same thing happened. The people in Ply-
mouth were so excited by what they had done that they tried to move Plymouth Rock to the 
center of town, but it was too heavy! 
 
The people also made all the Crown-appointed Council members resign. In some cases they vis-
ited Council members’ houses in great numbers (2,000 to Timothy Paine, 4,000 to Thomas 
Oliver). In other cases, they simply walked out of church when a Council member walked in, 
and that was enough to get the point across. All Council members either resigned or fled. 
 
Not a single juror in Massachusetts agreed to sit on a jury. 
  
The people continued holding town meetings. The Governor couldn’t do anything about this in 
most places. For example, in Salem, MA he arrested seven men who had called a town meeting, 
but he was forced to release them when 3,000 angry farmers marched on the jail. 
 
They had no special leaders. The people voted at every stage. As one annoyed British Loyalist 
wrote in his diary, “Government has devolved upon the people, and they seem to be for using 
it.”  
 
(For the full story, see First American Revolution by Ray Raphael. For a shorter version, see the 
last section in chapter 1 of People’s History of the American Revolution by Ray Raphael.)