A Short Play 

 
 
Many years later, after the war was over and the United States had become a strong, independ-
ent nation, a historian named Mellon Chamberlain interviewed Levi Preston, a veteran of the 
Battle of Concord about his role in the Revolutionary War. By then Levi Preston was an old 
man. The text below is a record of their conversation. 
 
 
INTERVIEWER: Why did you fight in the War? Were you oppressed by the Stamp Act? 
 
LEVI PRESTON: No, I never saw one of those stamps, and always understood that Governor 

Bernard put them all in Castle William. I am certain I never paid a penny for 
one of them. 

 
INTERVIEWER Well, what about the tea-tax? 
 
LEVI PRESTON: Tea-tax! I never drank a drop of the stuff; the boys threw it all overboard. 
 
INTERVIEWER: Then I suppose you had been reading Harrington or Sidney and Locke (these 

are all philosophers) about the eternal principles of liberty. 

 
LEVI PRESTON: Never heard of ‘em. We read only the Bible, The Catechism, Watts’ Psalms 

and Hymns, and the Almanack. 

 
INTERVIEWER: Well, then, what was the matter? What did you mean in going to fight? 
 
LEVI PRESTON: Young man, what we meant in going for those Redcoats was this: we always 

had governed ourselves, and we always meant to. They didn’t mean we 
should. 

 
 
 
 
This interview is quoted in Thomas A. Bailey and David M. Kennedy, eds., The American 
Spirit: United States History as Seen by Contemporaries
 (Lexington: D. C. Heath and Co., 
1994).