Getting Ready for Revolution: Taxation and the French and Indian War 

Supplement to Lesson 22: A New British Policy 

 
OPTIONAL LESSON 
 
Lesson Overview: 

 

The idea of a tax imposed by England instead of colonial assemblies was an uncomfortable one for 
colonists. In this lesson, students consider the lives of common people who made decisions about how 
to respond to two new British taxes and how they may have been influenced by the French and Indian 
War. Students gain insight into how people of another age lived and how they may have arrived at their 
decisions.  
 
Instructional Objectives: 
Students will  

1. Speculate how a colonial Lexington family might have responded to the Stamp Act and the 

Townshend Acts. 

2. Use evidence to hypothesize why those Acts were imposed on the colonists. 
3. Judge the level of influence the French and Indian War had on events leading up to the Revolu-

tionary War. 

 
Materials: 

 

Background paper: French and Indian War 
Lesson directions 
Interview forms (set of 7 per student) 
Newspaper planner  
Draft writing paper 
Broadside final copy paper  

 

Background for the Teacher:  

 

The road to the Revolutionary War began with the French and Indian War. As colonial people learned 
military tactics, gained confidence in protecting themselves, and asserted their rights as citizens, they 
flexed their independence and began to define the kind of leadership they wanted. The colonists’ ex-
perience in the French and Indian War helped shape their response to British taxation and military con-
trol. 
 
The French and Indian War (1756 – 1763), also called the Seven Years’ War, was a significant struggle 
over territory in North America. France and England had been warring for almost 100 years, but previ-
ous conflicts had been about thrones and power. The French and Indian War was about land. England 
was concerned that its colonies were becoming too densely populated; it particularly wanted to prevent 
the kind of manufacturing that arises in cities because then the colonies would start to compete with 
England! 
 
Instead, England wanted to expand its territories and start new settlements west over the Appalachians, 
but the French, who controlled a trade route via rivers from Canada to Louisiana, blocked them. France 
and England went to war over this and most of the battles occurred in New York and Canada. But the 
impact was felt further, for as the English conquered the French in North America, they went on to also