DIRECTIONS: NEWSPAPER ARTICLE PLANNER 

 
As you plan your newspaper article, remember you don’t want to simply list all the information 
you’ve gathered, you want to blend it together for your loyal readers, give it a clear message, and top 
it with a punchy headline that will draw readers’ attention. Even though the headline is the first thing 
people will read, it’s best to write that last, after the rest of your article is finished. 
 
 

1. Body:  

This is the main part of your article where you blend together the details of what you’ve uncovered. 
End the body of your article with a snappy conclusion.  
 
A newspaper article always answers the five questions. Remember to blend all the information to-
gether, not just list it. 
 

WHO?  

Who is the article about? Who is involved? The people involved give 
your article “human interest.” 

 

WHAT?  

 

What happened? 

 

WHERE? 

 

Where were the events located? Was anywhere else involved? 

 

WHEN? 

 

When is it? How long has this been going on? Place your events in  

 

 

 

time. 

 

WHY or HOW? 

Why is this important to know? Why is it happening? How will it effect 
the future? 

 

 
2. Lead:  

The first sentence or two of a newspaper article is called the “lead.” It holds a reader’s attention and 
sums up the main point or message of the story. It’s best to write the lead after you’ve written the 
body, then sum up everything and that’s your lead. If your loyal readers only looked at the lead, they 
would know what the article was all about, but they wouldn’t know the details. 
 
 

3. Headline: 

A well-written headline is short and punchy and grabs your readers’ attention to the article. It has NO 
unnecessary words. 
 
 

Put all three parts together:

 

For your final copy, put the headline first, in large, bold letters above the article. Next is the lead, in 
regular type, as the first paragraph of your article (it should only be a sentence or two). Lastly is the 
body, in regular type, with your conclusion at the end of the body. Write it out on the Broadside form 
with your name (the star reporter) at the top.