seize French territory in India, Africa, and the Caribbean. 

 

Following the French and Indian War, colonists were surprised and worried when Parliament 
imposed the Stamp Act and the Sugar Act as well as other taxes through the Townshend Acts. 
From the colonists’ initial point of view, the King was on the side of his “citizens” (as the colo-
nists viewed themselves). Parliament—which was seen as an oppressive money-hungering 
body—was standing between the good and fair King and his faithful subjects. 
 
A study of the American Revolution should include the French and Indian War because it  
“ended in the…dramatic rearrangement of the balance of power, in Europe and North America 
alike,” writes historian Fred Anderson in Crucible of War. He goes on to say, “Without the 
Seven Years’ War, American independence would surely have been long delayed.” He defines 
the war as a “theater of intercultural interaction” in which English colonists came into contact 
with French traders, a variety of Indian tribes (some allies and some enemies) and also with 
military authorities; “men who spoke their languages but who did not share their views of the 
war” or their view of the relationship between the colonies and England.  
 
Through their experience in the French and Indian War, British authorities believed that the best 
way to control the colonies was through Parliament. New England colonists gained confidence 
in protecting themselves through their military experience in the French and Indian War, and 
saw British soldiers as less necessary. They also began to define the kind of leadership they ad-
mired and responded to. These experiences would shape their later response to British taxation 
and military control and the roles that individuals played before and during the Revolution. 
 
The French and Indian War ended with the Treaty of Paris on February 10, 1763. The treaty 
gave North America east of the Mississippi, except for New Orleans, to the British. Spain got 
New Orleans and North America west of the Mississippi.  
 
Procedure: 

 

1. Introduce the newspaper article writing activity to the class using the “Directions: Gath-

ering Information” sheet as a guide. You may choose some students to read the direc-
tions aloud or have students read to themselves. 

 

2. Review students’ source material for their articles with them. These include the 

“Background Paper: The French and Indian War,” information in the textbook describ-
ing the Stamp Act and the Townsend Acts, and the seven “Interview Forms.”  

 

3. Once students have a handle on the material their article will draw from, introduce the 

“Directions: Newspaper Article Planner” as a guide for crafting an article from the in-
formation. 

 

4. Help students organize the body of their article, using the “5W”s. 

 

5. Allow students time to draft their articles from the materials available. 

 

6. When students finish reviewing and revising their drafts, they can write their final copy 

on the Broadside sheet.