DIRECTIONS: GATHERING INFORMATION 

 
The year is 1774. You are a reporter for The Colonial Times, a widely read Massachusetts newspa-
per. Your assignment is to write an article on people’s response to two new taxes, the Stamp Act 
and the Townsend Act. Your reporter’s instinct tells you that their reaction has something to do 
with the French and Indian War, but you need more information before you can write your story.  
 
When you’re ready, you will write a short newspaper article explaining the two new taxes (look in 
your textbook for a description of these), the people’s response to them, and how the French and 
Indian War may have influenced these responses and reactions. Write your final copy on the Broad-
side sheet so it will look like it came from a colonial newspaper. 
 
You decide to travel to Lexington, Massachusetts, a small farming town 15 miles outside of Bos-
ton, and interview a few people you meet. After you arrive and ask around a little bit, you choose to 
visit and speak with John Parker, his wife Lydia, and two of their seven children. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
While you are in Lexington you also meet with and interview three other people, Lexington resi-
dent Edmund Munroe, the town minister Reverend Jonas Clarke, and a merchant from Concord 
who you meet on the road on the way out of town. 
 
For each person you speak with you will fill out an interview form. At the top of the form is a quote 
they’ve said to you that you may choose to use in your article. The form will help you read into 
what they’ve said and pull information for your story. You will write a short newspaper article ex-
plaining the two new taxes (look in your textbook for a description of these), the people’s response 
to them, and how the French and Indian War influenced these responses and reactions. 

 
 

 

John Parker and his wife, Lydia, have three sons and four daughters. The 
boys learned their father's trade in woodworking and they help on the 
farm. The girls help their mother make the family's clothing, food and 
medicine. They are comfortable but not wealthy. You can tell from they 
way other people talk about him that John Parker is respected because 
people think he is a good farmer, a good woodworker, and a calm and fair 
man. Many people ask his advice.  
 
Their farm has 125 acres that takes a lot of work. The Parkers have their 
own oxen team and all the tools needed for sowing, reaping and process-
ing grains, for raking and pitching hay, and for chopping wood. In the 
kitchen, Lydia and her four daughters turn the milk of their nine cows into 
butter and cheese. The girls also turn the wool from their fourteen sheep 
into yarn on their spinning wheels. John Parker’s sons learned his trade 
from him. His specialty is making wheels, but he also makes and repairs 
farm tools, barrels, and furniture.  

     NOTE:  All quotes presented are fictitious