Spinning and Spinning Bees 

Supplement to Lesson 22: A New British Policy 

 

Supplement Activity Overview and Rationale: 
  
Using two primary sources, students will consider the increasing importance of colonial self-
sufficiency in the pre-Revolutionary years. This supplement is to show the active role of women in 
revolutionary resistance. 
 
Instructional Objectives: 
 
Students will  

1. Examine colonial propaganda used to influence public opinion. 
2. Explore ways in which colonists supported independence from Britain. 

 
Materials: 
 
Handout “Polly Allen Avery’s Remembrance of a Patriotic Spinning Contest in Boston” 
Handout “Foreign Productions She Rejects” 
 
Background for the Teacher: 

In newspaper articles of the 1760s and 1770s, women were urged to take responsibility for the success 
of the colonial boycott of British goods by making items that they had previously purchased. In this 
context, the real significance of patriotic spinning bees becomes clear. Men felt that most of the items 
they were taxed on were products that women used, such as imported textiles, imported teas, tea wares, 
silver and ceramics. If women would forgo these imported luxuries for the sake of patriotism, the colo-
nial boycott of British goods had a better chance of working. The patriotic spinning bee might have 
been a plan to persuade ladies that homespun and simple wares were stylishly acceptable, in the name 
of liberty.  
 
But the goal was not really to have every home producing skeins and skeins of linen and woolen 
thread, but to have women publicly showing their rejection of costly imported goods and their support 
for new, simpler styles of clothing and household furnishing. 
 
In the first primary source, “Polly Allen Avery’s Remembrance of a Patriotic Spinning Contest in Bos-
ton, around 1770,” the granddaughter of Polly Allen Avery tells a story about her grandmother that was 
often repeated in the family. Polly was born in Boston in 1755 to Joseph Allen, a tailor, and Mary Ad-
ams, sister of the patriot Sam Adams. After her father died, 15 year old Polly went to live with her Un-
cle Sam Adams, the famous revolutionary leader. Polly was a teenager in Boston during the colonial 
boycott of British goods. 
 
“Grandmother expressed a great interest and much enthusiasm in regard to the great questions which 
agitated the country,” writes Polly’s granddaughter Mary. “ She spoke of the terror they all felt, when 
one day a mounted horseman rode furiously through the street shouting at the top of his voice: ‘Our 
brethren are falling like slaughtered sheep in King Street’ (now State Street).” This event that Polly re-
membered so well was the Boston Massacre.