“Polly Allen Avery’s Remembrance of a Patriotic Spinning Contest” reveals several interesting 
things about spinning contests. It was the “select” young misses of the best patriot families who 
received spinning lessons. At the end of their instruction there was a spinning contest for all the 
girls that doubled as a large, community social event.  
 
The public spinning by social elites was more of a patriotic ceremony than a true transition to a 
widespread increase in local textile production. The issue here, as Polly herself sums it up, was 
honor. In this case it was the symbolic act of swearing off purchasing expensive imported tex-
tiles in support of the colonial boycott of British goods. 
 
The second primary source, the poem “Foreign Productions She Rejects” was published in the 
Boston Evening Post on September 11, 1769. 
 
Procedure 
 

1. After completing Lesson 22: A New British Policy, review the colonial boycott of Brit-

ish goods as a response to the Townsend Acts. In particular, introduce the importance of 
women spinning thread for fabric as a replacement for imported British fabric. 

 
2. Hand out “Polly Allen Avery’s Remembrance of a Patriotic Spinning Contest in Bos-

ton.” Read aloud with the class. Discuss the vocabulary and possibly re-read the piece. 
As a class, lead a discussion based on the following questions: 

 

•  How did people get their clothes in colonial times? What if you were from a 

wealthy family? What if you weren’t? 

 

In colonial times, the women in the family were responsible for the family members 
clothes. In the wealthiest of all families, the finished clothes may have been purchased 
from a shop. In the merely well off, fabric could be imported from England ready to be 
cut and sewn into clothes for a lesser cost. In the least wealthy families (which is to say 
most families) the women and girls would harvest flax or raw wool, prepare it to be spun 
into thread, do all the spinning, weave the spun thread into fabric, then cut and sew the 
clothes. 

 
•  What is meant by the term “select” families? Who are the “select” families?  

 

The select families are those with wealth or status.

  

 
•  What was the special purpose in teaching the daughters of the “select” fami-

lies to spin in support of the colonial boycott? What is the purpose of having 
the public view the girls’ skill at the end of instruction? 

 

The special purpose in teaching the daughters of select families to spin was in setting a 
fashionable example for all others to follow. As fashion often dictates behavior and most 
women and girls followed the example of the select daughters. Polly was probably in-
cluded in this group because of her connection to Sam Adams. 

 
•  Polly’s granddaughter calls it “the art of spinning” Would the average family 

think of spinning as an “art?” No! Why not?