Polly Allen Avery’s Remembrance of a Patriotic Spinning Contest  

in Boston, around 1770 

 

From the “Reminiscences of Thomas White and Mary White Davis” 

 
Polly was a teenager in Boston in the 1700s where she lived with her uncle, the famous revolution-
ary leader Sam Adams. As you know, the British taxed the colonists on various products and the 
colonists rebelled. One of the ways they thought to rebel was by refusing to buy the British goods 
that were taxed, such as fabric made in England. 
 
But how to inspire everyone to boycott? A boycott doesn’t work well unless a LOT of people do it 
together.  
 
Read Polly’s story below, (which was written by Polly’s granddaughter, Mary) and see if you can 
figure out the answers to the questions that follow. All the words in bold have definitions on the 
next page. 

 

 

“An interesting incident of those days, which my grandmother related, was 
the formation of an association of young misses from the select families of 
those who were known, as she termed them, the ‘High Sons and Daughters 
of Liberty,’ who should be instructed by a competent teacher in the art of 
spinning flax upon the little wheel. My grandmother was invited to join 
them. 

 

Each young lady was provided with a wheel and material to work with, and at 
the close of the term of instruction, was presented with the wheel upon 
which she spun. There was also an exhibition of their skill . . . at the close 
of the term, given at Faneuil Hall, when a prize would be adjudged to the 
young lady who should produce the greatest number of knots of good 
thread from a given amount of flax (a half-pound, I think) in the shortest 
period of time. 

 

I have often heard my grandmother speak of the trepidation of mind she 
experienced in the presence of the ‘High Sons and Daughters of Liberty.’ 
As she was intent on her spinning, one of the aforesaid people, in walking 
around and noting the busy workers, drew near her wheel and remarked 
‘Oh, you will get the prize,’ but that she pointed to the wheel of a near 
neighbor, saying, ‘Oh no sir; see Miss Blank’s spool is much fuller than mine.’ 
But he said, ‘Don’t you see, Puss, yours is the finest!’  

 

At the close of the trial, when led by the hand onto the platform, where it 
was announced that Miss Polly Allen Avery had spun the greatest number of 
knots of good yarn from the given quantity of flax in the shortest time and 
was adjudged worthy of the prize, she felt very much abashed.   

 

‘What was the prize?’ we asked. She replied, ‘only a laurel wreath, but the 
honor!’”