From Sources to Stories:  Reconstructing Revolutionary 

Lexington in the Classroom

Mary Babson Fuhrer

University of New Hampshire

o

n an apRiL MoRning in 1775, seventy-seven Lexington farmers 

took a stand on their town common and started a revolution.  generations of 

townspeople have honored these yeomen soldiers—the Battle of Lexington 

is re-enacted at dawn every april 19

th

—and generations of schoolchildren 

have learned the story of Lexington and Concord.

1

  perhaps because of this 

heightened attention, the farm families of late colonial Lexington are well-

documented in a range of primary sources: tax lists, probate inventories, 

account books, diaries, town meeting records, sermons, and newspapers 

preserve many details of daily life for ordinary people who happened to do 

an extraordinary thing.  These primary sources offer students—from grade 

school to high school—an opportunity to revisit revolutionary Lexington.  

For younger students, these records can evoke the experience of living in 

revolutionary times; for more sophisticated students, the sources offer a 

way to ground speculation about causes and motivations in evidence. 

The national Heritage Museum (nHM) in Lexington probed these pri-

mary materials in preparing “Sowing the Seeds of Liberty,” the museum’s 

permanent exhibit on the events and meanings of april 19

th

.  Research drew 

on the everyday records generated by living and dying, farming and trad-

ing, preaching and keeping the peace in a late colonial town.

2

  The story 

of farm and community life as seen through the reconstructed experience 

The History Teacher     Volume 42   number 4     august 2009 

© Mary Babson Fuhrer