506 

Mary Babson Fuhrer

ifred Barr Rothenberg, From Market-Places to a Market Economy:  The Transformation of 

Rural Massachusetts, 1750-1850 (Chicago, iL:  University of Chicago press, 1994).  For 

a woman’s account book, see Laurel T. Ulrich, The Midwife’s Tale:  The Life of Martha 

Ballard Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812 (new York:  alfred a. Knopf, 1991).

21. on the growing demand for imported continental luxury goods, see especially 

T. H. Breen, The Marketplace of Revolution:  How Consumer Politics Shaped American 

Independence (new York:  oxford University press, 2004).

22. on Whig thought and Republican ideology, see Bernard Bailyn, 

The Ideological 

Origins of the American Revolution (Cambridge, Ma:  Harvard University press, 1967); 

gordon Wood, 

Creation of the American Republic (Chapel Hill, nC:  University of north 

Carolina press, 1969); J. g. a. pocock, 

Machiavellian Moment:  Florentine Political 

Thought and the Atlantic Republican Tradition (princeton, nJ:  princeton University 

press, 1975); or Robert Shalhope, “Toward a Republican Synthesis:  The Emergence of 

an Understanding of Republicanism in american Historiography,” 

William and Mary 

Quarterly 29 (1972): 49-80.

23. 

Massachusetts Spy, Thursday, December 16, 1773, page 3, available on the nHM 

website.

24. For discussion of such a hypothesis see T. H. Breen, “ideology and national-

ism on the Eve of the american Revolution:  Revisions once More in need of Revising,” 

Journal of American History 84, no. 1 (June 1997): 13-39.

25. on the critical role that the historian plays in selecting which evidence to use—and 

the ideological part he or she plays in that process—see Eric gable, Richard Handler, and 

Anna Lawson, “On the Uses of Relativism, Fact, Conjecture, and Black and White Histories 

at Colonial Williamsburg,” American Ethnologist 19, no. 4 (november 1992): 791-805.

26. “[H]istorians… configure the events of the past into causal sequences—sto-

ries—that order and simplify those events to give them new meanings.  We do so because 

narrative is the chief literary form that tries to find meaning in an overwhelmingly crowded 

and disordered chronological reality.  When we choose a plot to order our… histories, we 

give them a unity that neither nature nor the past possesses so clearly.  in doing so, we 

move… into the intensely human realm of value.”  William Cronon, “a place for Stories: 

nature, History, and narrative,” 

The Journal of American History 78, no. 4 (March 1992): 

1349.

27. Roy Rosenzweig, Susan porter Benson, and Stephen Brier, eds., 

Presenting 

the Past:  Essays on History and the Public (philadelphia, pa:  Temple University press, 

1986), xxiii-xxiv.