498 

Mary Babson Fuhrer

of ten families became the basis of the exhibit.

3

  The unearthed primary 

resources were so rich, however, that museum staff wanted to make 

them useful in the classroom as well as in the exhibition.  in the summer 

of 2007, nHM hosted two teacher workshops—one for elementary and 

one for high school teachers —on ways to use these primary sources to 

recover a lost world.

Workshop participants examined and layered evidence of one family’s 

world: household composition; the structure, spaces, furnishings, and 

tools of their home; the layout and functioning of their farm; and the web 

of neighbors and kin with whom they shared—and upon whom they de-

pended for—life’s necessities.  Each new piece of evidence enlarged their 

knowledge of family and community life and increased their understand-

ing of daily work, the rhythms and meanings of their small-farm world.  

They looked at how the family might provide for the next generation, 

and considered what strategies they might use to obtain newly desired 

store-bought and imported goods.  They realized the tremendous pressures 

bearing down on this long-settled town as land and money grew scarce 

while needs and wants multiplied.  Finally, they considered the townsfolk’s 

response to escalating tensions in the winter of 1775.

For elementary school teachers, the goal was to turn evidence into sto-

ries that would allow their students to imagine the lives of children from 

the past.  For the final project, each of the teachers assumed the persona 

of a member of their study family and presented stories in narratives of 

perceived good and evil, difficult choices, and dramatic consequences.

4

  

Teachers took back to their classrooms authentic stories of thirty Lexington 

children from 1775, so that their students could also assume the persona 

of real children from the past.

5

High school teachers performed the same family and community 

reconstruction, but with a more critical emphasis on the reliability of 

evidence, assessing its inherent limitations and bias, acknowledging the 

“constructed” nature of historical interpretation, and drawing interpreta-

tions about motivation.  Their goal was to gain a familiarity with their 

family that gave them the confidence to imagine hopes and fears in the 

spring of 1775, and to speculate as to why men took to the green on april 

19

th

.  That process is illustrated below using the family of John parker, 

militia captain on the morning of april 19

th

, as a model.

6

  (primary sources 

used in this exercise are posted on nHM’s education website at <http://

nationalheritagemuseum.typepad.com/learning>.)

We began by reconstructing John parker’s household using vital re-

cords to establish the nuclear family and checking town clerk’s records 

for evidence of other persons—such as apprentices, servants, or town 

poor—who might be living with the household in 1775.

7

  We determined