From Sources to Stories 

499

that the parker household in 1775 likely included John (age 46), his wife 

Lydia (age 45), and seven children (ranging from nineteen to four years 

old), representing a typical household.

8

What could we learn of their home and possessions?  The Lexington tax 

assessment of 1774 revealed to us that the family was comparatively well 

off, ranking in the top 20% of their townsfolk for assessed wealth.

9

  But 

when we examined a memoir and sketch of the homestead, we discovered 

a modest abode.  Their “ancient” farmstead was a typical five-room saltbox 

with two front rooms downstairs, a kitchen running the rear length of the 

house, and east and west “chambers” on the second floor.

10

  The structure 

was sturdy but not stylish; other homes built in Lexington by mid-century 

followed the new, more refined Georgian fashion.  We examined images 

of these other examples and considered what that might say about the 

values—or financial concerns—of the Parker family.

Then, using Capt. parker’s 1775 probate inventory—a listing of house-

hold possessions recorded at the time of death—we tried to imagine the 

interior furnishings and uses.

11

  By the mid-eighteenth century, many 

prosperous new England farmers were embellishing their homes with the 

latest imported textiles, ceramics, furniture, and such consumer adornments 

fit for an aspiring gentry.

12

  Yet the parker furnishings, despite the family’s 

economic status, were sparse.  other than a tall case clock and two mirrors 

(considered luxury goods), the family’s possessions were nearly all utilitar-

ian.  The kitchen was stocked with pewter, stoneware, and iron, but lacked 

the silver, fine china, and teaware of aspiring gentry.  Tools of production 

such as spinning wheels, cheese presses, pickle tubs, butter churns, and 

cider barrels far outnumbered the three tables, “old chests,” great chair, 

and simple wooden chairs that provided, along with their three beds, the 

whole of their furniture.  as we imagined walking room to room with the 

appraisers, we noted the plain, functional furnishing and the multiple uses 

of rooms as living and workspaces.  We lingered in what would have been 

the “best room:” the parlor with the family’s “best bed,” one oval table set 

with pewter, the master’s comfortable great chair and tall case clock, and 

a small writing desk, likely placed near the window where natural light 

helped parker, wearing his “spectacles,” keep his farm and woodworking 

accounts.  The modest outfitting, we noted, could reflect practical, temper-

ate tastes, or it could indicate limited family resources.

13

Leaving parker’s house, we turned to his farmland.  We discussed how 

owning land gave the yeoman his sense of security and freedom.

14

  parker’s 

fields and the labor of his sons provided raw materials; the tools of the 

farmhouse and the labor of his wife and daughters turned those materi-

als into essential household goods.  Using the Massachusetts Valuation 

of 1771, which described property by usage (meadow, pasture, tillage)