500 

Mary Babson Fuhrer

and livestock by type (oxen, cows, horses, sheep, swine), we recorded 

parker’s holdings.

15

  Then we compared his farm to the average needed 

for a “comfortable subsistence.”

16

  We determined that parker held enough 

tillage, pasture, meadow, and woodland to provide for his family’s meat, 

grain, dairy, vegetables, clothing fiber, and fuel—all their essential con-

sumables except salt.

17

But, we noted, parker’s seventy-eight acres were not enough land to 

provide sustainable farms for his three sons when they came of age.

18

  

The need to find cash for land threatened to increase the debt that Parker 

already carried, for he still owed his brothers for their share of the farm he 

had inherited from his father.  This was becoming an increasingly common 

arrangement in land-strapped Lexington, and we discussed how the need 

to repay existing debt and find cash to set up children on estates might 

have weighed on men like parker.

19

The farm economy, then, provided most but not all of the parker family’s 

essential needs.  To procure basic goods or services that they could not 

produce on their own farms, families turned to the neighborhood economy.  

parker, like most of his neighbors, practiced a craft in addition to farming.  

We examined his woodworking account book and learned that parker 

traded his woodshop products for neighbors’ household goods or labor.  

When they “reckoned” accounts, neighbors usually carried forward credit 

or debit balances; this neighborhood economy efficiently distributed goods 

and met shortfalls without resort to cash or interest-bearing debt.  We 

considered how the neighborhood trade both eased credit and bound the 

parkers and their neighbors with ties of mutual interdependence.

20

Together, Lexington’s farm and neighborhood economies worked 

efficiently to provide almost everything that farm familes needed.  The 

challenge was that they did not provide everything families wanted.  The 

eighteenth century was a period of rising standards of living, and Lex-

ingtonians coveted luxury imports that stocked the shelves of port city 

stores.

21

  To encounter this world of goods, we examined advertisements 

from Boston newspapers.  We noted the vast assortment of dressgoods 

imported from England and india, the pewter, brass, and “cutlery and 

hardware of all kinds,” the ornate looking glasses, fine china, wall pa-

pers, and, of course, sugar, spices, and teas from distant shores.  Most 

especially, we noted that almost without exception, the advertisements 

stated, “CaSH onLY.”

Returning to the parker inventory, we noted imported items that must 

have been purchased with cash: looking glasses, brassware, some cutlery.  

Were these purchases increasing over time?  To answer this, we turned to 

a pair of father and son inventories for the neighboring Fiske family in 

order to compare tableware owned at mid-century and at the end of the