502 

Mary Babson Fuhrer

use of Bohea tea [imported black tea] of all sorts... and to manifest the 

sincerity of their resolution, they brought together every ounce contained 

in the town and committeed it to one common bonfire.”

23

  We noted that 

this Lexington “Tea party” occurred on December 13

th

, three days before 

the more famous party in Boston Harbor.

our workshop participants had, by this point, examined and evaluated 

evidence to reconstruct their study family’s household and home, farm and 

trade, faith and community; they were now asked to assign meaning to 

actions, motive to choices.  With their enriched understanding of the world 

of Lexington’s militia men, participants speculated on the motivations of 

the town’s tea-burners and citizen-soldiers.  predictably, interpretations 

varied.  Most concluded that fear played a major role for the militia men 

and their families: fear of losing farms, economic independence, and  

political rights.  Some mentioned insecurity brought on by the shortage 

of land and the increased dependence on consumer goods, or simply by 

an increased pace of social change.  others focused on anger at imperial 

authorities for perceived abuse or resentment at being treated as lessor 

citizens by virtue of their colonial status.

24

  Most shared the view that the 

farm folk of Lexington prized the rights and civic roles to which they felt 

entitled as independent yeomen, and they were determined to protect their 

traditional status.

That there would be a variety of interpretaions was predictable.  We 

consistently stressed that our goal, though building upon factual evidence, 

was not to determine a historical truth.  The shortcomings of evidence, the 

bias we inevitably bring to analysis, the speculative nature of much of our 

inquiry, all made recovery of an actual lived past impossible.

25

  Rather, 

participants were challenged to analyze critically and interpret evidence in 

a way that they believed offered a meaningful explanation of human action.  

They were encouraged to present their interpretations as a story, a narrative 

informed by evidence and imagination, that speaks to causal relationships, 

contingency, and human agency.  it imbues the past with meaning.

26

This exercise offers one final historical insight.  As students attempt to 

engage with their historical subject, they can better grapple with the ways 

in which ordinary people made history.  Had John parker and his neighbors 

not acted, or had they acted differently, history would have been different.  

Such a realization highlights both historical agency (the power inherent in 

choosing to act) and historical contingency (the possibility that things might 

have turned out otherwise.)  These are transformative insights.  “grasping 

the contingent nature of the past can break the tyranny of the present; see-

ing how historical actors made and remade social life, we can gain a new 

vision of our own present and future.  That is perhaps the most important 

lesson historians can help people to draw from the past.”

27