From Sources to Stories 

503

notes

1. 

The story of the Battle of Lexington has been told many times.  The earliest 

versions were recorded as depositions of witnesses in the provincial Record Book of 

Massachusetts, 1775.  The battle was retold in commemorative sermons and addresses 

over the next half century; see Jonas Clarke, “The Fate of the Blood thirsty oppressors, 

and god’s tender Care of his oppressed people:  a Sermon preached at Lexington, april 

19

th

, 1776” in the collections of the Lexington Historical Society, also in Charles Evans, 

American Bibliography (Chicago, iL:  by the author, 1903), 14679.  in the nineteenth 

century, commemorative accounts were published, including Elias phinney, 

History of 

the Battle of Lexington (Boston, Ma:  phelps & Farnham, 1825); Richard Frothingham, 

History of Siege of Boston, the Battles of Lexington and Concord, and Bunker Hill, reprint, 

4

th

 edition, (Boston, Ma:  Little, Brown, and Co., 1873); and Rev. artemas Muzzey, The 

Battle of Lexington, With Personal Recollections of the Men Engaged in It (Boston, Ma:  

D. Clapp & Sons, printers, 1877).  Early twentieth-century accounts include Frank W. 

Coburn, Battle of April 19

th

, 1775 (Lexington, Ma:  by the author, 1912); Harold Murdock, 

The Nineteenth of April, 1775 (Boston, MA:  Houghton Mifflin, 1923); and Allen French, 

Day of Concord and Lexington (Boston, Ma:  Little, Brown, and Co., 1925).  arthur B. 

Tourtellot’s classic version, William Diamond’s Drum, appeared first in 1959 and was re-

published by W. W. norton in 2000 as 

Lexington and Concord:  The Beginning of the War 

of the American Revolution.  See also David Hackett Fischer, Paul Revere’s Ride (new 

York:  oxford University press, 1995).

2. 

This research was based on the model provided by Robert a. gross’s classic 

study of the neighboring town of Concord, The Minutemen and Their World (new York:  

Hill and Wang, 1976).  The social history methods developed by the new England town 

studies authors, particularly phillip J.greven, 

Four Generations:  Population, Land and 

Family in Colonial Andover, Massachusetts (ithaca, nY:  Cornell University press, 1970); 

Kenneth a. Lockridge, 

A New England Town:  The First Hundred Years (new York:  W. W. 

norton & Co., 1970); John Demos, 

A Little Commonwealth (new York:  oxford University 

press, 1970); and Michael Zuckerman, 

Peaceable Kingdoms:  New England Towns in the 

Eighteenth Century (new York:  alfred Knopf, 1970) were also used.

3. 

an overview of the national Heritage Museum’s exhibit, “Sowing the Seeds of 

Liberty,” is available online at <

http://www.monh.org/Default.aspx?tabid=162

>.

4. 

Bruce VanSledright’s research on appropriate history goals for elementary 

schoolchildren suggests that they are capable of understanding “story-like dimensions 

(e.g., heroes, plots), binary distinctions (e.g., good versus evil), and human intentionality 

(e.g., the act of making choices based on desire).”  Bruce VanSledright and Jere Brophy, 

“Storytelling, imagination, and Fanciful Elaboration in Children’s Historical Reconstruc-

tions,” American Educational Research Journal 29, no. 4 (Winter 1992): 840.

5. 

These curriculum materials are available through the national Heritage Museum’s 

website at the curriculum webpage at <http://nationalheritagemuseum.org>.  Elementary 

school lessons are also available on that webpage and through nHM’s education website 

at <http://nationalheritagemuseum.typepad.com/learning>.

6. 

The primary documents that we used, along with worksheets for analysis, are 

available on the curriculum webpage at the national Heritage Museum’s website, <http://

nationalheritagemuseum.org>. 

7. 

Charles Hudson, 

History of the Town of Lexington Middlesex County Massa-

chusetts:  From Its First Settlement to 1868, Revised to 1912 by the Lexington Historical 

Society (Boston, MA:  Houghton Mifflin, 1913). 

8. 

Eighteenth-century Massachusetts farm families, in which children provided