M

asonic Washington comes to Lexington,
MA, on  Dec. 19, when the National
 Heritage Museum opens the exhibition,

“The Initiated Eye: Secrets,  Symbols, Freemasonry
and the Architecture of   Washington, DC.” 

The  centerpiece of the exhibition is a collection of

21 paintings commissioned by the Grand Lodge of
the District of Columbia in 2005 from artist Peter
 Waddell. Subject to numerous  conspiracy theories
and myths, the street plan and architecture of our
 nation’s capital have long been  intertwined with
 Freemasonry.

“The Initiated Eye” aims to tell the real story to

trace the history of Freemasonry in the district and
to study the symbolism inherent in many of the
city’s prominent buildings. 

As most will remember from their childhood

 history lessons, the Continental Congress met in
Philadelphia and declared independence for the
American colonies. 

When George Washington was sworn in as the

nation’s first President, the capital was in New York.
It returned to Philadelphia for ten years between
1790 and 1800 while Washington, DC, was built.

As President, George Washington oversaw the

land surveys that set the boundaries of the
ten-mile-square federal district. 

A meeting between  Washington and the

surveyors, James Ellicott and  Benjamin Banneker, is
the subject of one painting in the exhibition. 

Artist Peter Waddell undertook  careful research

in order to produce accurate  depictions of the
 historic people, places and events depicted in his
paintings. 

Originally from New Zealand, he  became a U.S.

citizen in 1993 and has  pursued a number of
historic and architectural painting projects. 

In addition to the

 paintings shown in
“The Initiated Eye,”
Waddell has
 completed works for
Mount Vernon,
 Kenmore in
 Fredericksburg, VA,
and Belair Mansion in
Bowie, MD.

The paintings in

the exhibition trace
Washington Masonic
and architectural
 history through the
1800s to the
mid-1900s. 

Several of the

paintings
 commemorate
 Masonic ceremonies
held in the  capital, such as the cornerstone layings
for the U.S. Capitol and the Washington
Monument. An  Auspicious Dayshows President
George  Washington wearing his Masonic apron and
regalia as he prepares to lay the cornerstone for the
Capitol on Sept. 18, 1793.

On July 4, 1848, then-President (and Freemason)

James K. Polk presided over the cornerstone laying
for the Washington Monument. 

Honored guests that day included Dolley

Madison, making her last public appearance at the
venerable age of 80, Mrs. Alexander Hamilton, and
George Washington’s adopted son, George
Washington Parke Custis. 

Waddell’s The Cornerstone of the Nationshows the

honored guests seated on the reviewing stand, while

10

November 2009 

The Northern Light

By AIMEE E. NEWELL 

COMES TO LEXINGTON

Masonic Lantern,

1810-1820,

 National Heritage

Museum, gift of

the estate of

Charles V. Hagler.

Photograph by

John M. Miller

WASHINGTON, DC