The Northern Light

November 2009

11

a group of Freemasons follow the time-honored
 cornerstone ceremony. The monument’s cornerstone,
weighing 24,500 pounds, was laid that day with the
same trowel that Washington used at the Capitol in
1793.

While the painting of the cornerstone laying for

the Washington monument depicts a festive
 atmosphere, another painting, Laying Down the
Working Tools,
represents a more somber ceremony
— the Masonic funeral. 

In the background of the painting, Masons in

their top hats and black coats can be seen processing

from Potomac Lodge to the  cemetery. 

Originally chartered in Maryland in 1789, this

lodge was the first to be chartered in what is now the
 District of Columbia.

In addition to commemorating the history of

Washington and some of the most oft-performed
Masonic ceremonies, the exhibition also includes
paintings of the District of Columbia headquarters
for several Masonic appendant bodies. 

Two paintings show the Scottish Rite Southern

Jurisdiction’s House of the Temple, built between
1911 and 1915. 

 

 

I

n the May 2009 issue of The Northern Light,
we showed a picture of a set of jewels from an
unknown Masonic or fraternal group and

asked whether anyone could help to identify them. 

Prior to the article, Supreme Council staff

suggested that the jewels might be from the
Daughters of the Nile or the White Shrine of
Jerusalem, but comparisons to symbols and jewels
from those groups are not conclusive.  

As The Northern Lighthit mailboxes across the

jurisdiction, readers wasted no time in contacting
the museum with suggestions. One reader noted
the comparison between the star and crescent on
the jewels and at the Odd Fellows cemetery in
Ennis, TX. While similar, the mystery jewels differ
significantly from other Odd Fellows jewels in the
National Heritage Museum collection. 

For another reader, the symbols on the mystery

jewels called to mind the moon and star seen on
jewelry for members of the Dramatic Order of
Knights of Khorassan, an appendant group for the
Knights of Pythias. But comparisons between our
mystery jewels and the symbols for this group did
not turn up a conclusive match. 

Still another reader suggested that the jewels

might be associated with the Moorish Science
Temple of America, while another recommended
contacting a long-time fraternal jewel
manufacturer. 

All of the suggestions were generously

welcomed, and we hope to continue searching to
eventually identify this group of jewels.

Perhaps you can assist us with a new
mystery. 

Recently, the museum was given this green fez
embroidered with the words, “Caliphs of Bagdad.”
To date, research has not been able to determine
when or where this fez was originally worn. Does
it look familiar? Do you have any information on
similar fez? If so, contact Aimee E. Newell,
director of collections, at anewell@monh.org or
781-457-4144.

Another Mystery 

from the National Heritage Museum Collection . . .

Fez, early 20th century, National Heritage Museum, 
gift of Stanley A McCollough. 

Photograph by David Bohl.