The Northern Light

November 2009

13

allows visitors to better envision how they were used.
At the same time,  seeing three-dimensional objects
from the paintings provides a sense of their actual
size and texture. 

The painting A Meeting at the End of the Day

shows 1790s Freemasons, including architect James
Hoban, whose design was chosen for the White
House, coming  together. 

At back center, a tin lantern hangs in the window.

As common household items, tin lanterns were
useful, but also offered the opportunity for  decorative
patterns to be punched into the tin to allow the light
to shine through. 

The lantern in the painting prominently shows

the Masonic symbol, “G.” 

In the exhibit, the painting will be paired with a

punched tin lantern from the museum’s collection,
which also has Masonic designs.

The objects from the museum’s collection also

provide a means to discuss Masonic symbols and
 educate our non-Masonic visitors about
Freemasonry. 

The painting Building the Temple Withinshows an

elaborate Scottish Rite backdrop. Central to the
image is a pair of columns topped with celestial and
terrestrial globes. 

Accompanying the painting in the gallery will be

a pair of columns from the museum collection. The
museum’s columns also include celestial and
terrestrial globes on top. 

Representing the pillars of King Solomon’s

Temple, Jachin and Boaz, the columns symbolize

The United States Capitol

building was planned as the

anchor of the entire design

for the Federal City.

L’Enfant placed the Capitol

on the west end of Jenkin’s

Hill, the most prominent

hilltop from which it “might

be seen from twenty mile

off.”

Preparing to lay the
cornerstone of the Capitol
on Sept. 18, 1793, George
Washington is shown in full
Masonic regalia
accompanied by one of his
favorite dogs, “Duchess.”
After crossing the Potomac
from Alexandria, he is likely
to have prepared for the
ceremony in an upper room
of a small dwelling located
on New Jersey Avenue, S.E.,
the present site of the House
Office Building. This was the
first meeting place for
Federal Lodge No. 1, a
lodge formed by
stonemasons working on the
construction of the White
House.